Predictive Validity of the Graduate Record Examination Advanced Psychology Test for Grade Performance in Graduate Psychology Courses

By House, J. Daniel; Johnson, James J. | College Student Journal, March 2002 | Go to article overview

Predictive Validity of the Graduate Record Examination Advanced Psychology Test for Grade Performance in Graduate Psychology Courses


House, J. Daniel, Johnson, James J., College Student Journal


Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are often considered during the admissions process for prospective graduate students and there have been several assessments of the predictive validity of the GRE for graduate students in psychology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictive validity of the GRE Advanced Psychology Test for students' grade performance in selected graduate courses. Academic records were evaluated for 236 graduate students in professional psychology programs. Higher GRE scores were significantly correlated with higher grades in several specific courses. These findings indicate that, in some instances, GRE Advanced Psychology Test scores are significantly correlated with subsequent performance in selected graduate psychology courses.

**********

Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are often considered during the admissions process for prospective graduate students (Oltman & Hartnett, 1984). There have been several assessments of the predictive validity of the GRE for graduate students in psychology. Most of these studies have examined the validity of the Verbal (GRE-V) and Quantitative (GRE-Q) sections of the GRE for the prediction of subsequent achievement outcomes. For instance, GRE scores have been found to be significant predictors of cumulative grade performance (House, Gupta, & Xiao, 1997), grades in specific graduate psychology courses (House & Johnson, 1998; Huitema & Stein, 1993), and graduate degree completion (House & Johnson, 1993a). Further, GRE scores were significantly correlated with a multifaceted rating that reflected student progress in a clinical psychology graduate program (Dollinger, 1989). Recent results also suggest that GRE scores were significant predictors of whether American Indian/Alaska Native students completed their graduate degrees (House, 1997). A more limited number of studies, however, have examined the validity of the GRE Advanced Psychology Test and those studies have produced conflicting results. GRE Advanced Psychology Test scores were found to significantly predict the comprehensive examinations performance of students in clinical psychology (Kirnan & Geisinger, 1981) and graduate grade performance (Federici & Schuerger, 1974). House and Johnson (1993b) found that GRE Advanced Psychology Test scores were significantly correlated with the cumulative graduate GPA of students in professional psychology programs.

There are multiple criteria that may be used to assess graduate student achievement, including grades, degree completion, time to degree completion, and examinations performance (Hartnett & Willingham, 1980). While GRE Advanced Psychology Test scores were significant predictors of cumulative graduate GPA, it has been noted that further study is needed to determine if scores would be significantly related to other types of criterion measures, such as grades earned in specific courses (House & Johnson, 1993b). Consequently, the purpose of this study was to investigate the predictive validity of the GRE Advanced Psychology Test for students' grade performance in their graduate courses.

Methods

Academic records were evaluated for 236 graduate students enrolled in professional psychology programs at a large midwestern university. The sample was comprised of 101 students in clinical psychology, 76 students in counseling psychology, and 59 students in school psychology. Data were collected for three predictor variables, GRE Advanced Psychology Test scores and the Experimental and Social subscores from the Advanced Psychology Test. In addition, students' grades in ten courses frequently taken by graduate students in these programs were compiled. Course grades were assigned on a 4-point scale (A = 4 and F = 0). Validity coefficients were computed for the relationship between GRE scores and course grades. Given the number of correlations being tested, the Bonferroni approach to multiple significance tests was utilized and a conservative significance level of . …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Predictive Validity of the Graduate Record Examination Advanced Psychology Test for Grade Performance in Graduate Psychology Courses
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.