The Profile: Heather White - Go Wilde for Oscar at the Weekend Festival; Project Oscar Wilde Is the Brainchild of Heather White Who, as ANNE PALMER Finds out, Has; a Passion for the 'Quirky' Side of the Man

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), April 25, 2002 | Go to article overview

The Profile: Heather White - Go Wilde for Oscar at the Weekend Festival; Project Oscar Wilde Is the Brainchild of Heather White Who, as ANNE PALMER Finds out, Has; a Passion for the 'Quirky' Side of the Man


Byline: Anne Palmer

WHEN Heather White said turn left and head for the mountains, I thought she was joking. But I managed to locate her home, deep in the countryside, perched on a hilltop on the scenic border linking Fermanagh with Donegal.

Tucked away at the entrance to her beautifully restored traditional farm cottage, Heather has created the nerve centre for the increasingly successful Project Oscar Wilde.

But the warm Wildean welcome is also about to embrace visitors from the mainland, Ireland and from as far away as Canada, as the first Fermanagh- based Oscar Wilde Weekend festival gets under way.

Heather is the chairperson of Project Oscar Wilde and has been the stalwart behind the new Enniskillen festival.

Dublin-born Oscar Wilde attended Portora Royal School from 1864 to 1871 and it is Wilde's schooldays that have been the project's initial focus of attention.

Heather's creative flair and enthusiasm, coupled with her quest for a quality event, are most striking. Her dedication to the project is evident in the three new books Heather has just written about the great Irish dramatist.

Forgotten Schooldays, along with Wildefire and A Wilde Family, together open a door to the life and times of the much talked about flamboyant character.

Methodically researched, these books are brimming with intriguing detail about the early life of Oscar Wilde, revealing new and previously unpublished facts.

According to the Belfast-born writer, the number of books which have been written about Oscar Wilde, since his death in 1900 in Paris, is incredible but she points out that there has been a tendency to focus on his later life, his meteoric rise, trial and terrible fall.

But it is the quirky side of Oscar Wilde's life that has caught the Ulsterwoman's attention.

'I'm interested in his early Irish childhood. His parents were extraordinarily mysterious and intriguing people. There are so many unanswered questions that, when you start to read about them, you just want to know more,' said Heather.

'Most of what has been written about him is from his Oxford years onwards,' she added.

In her research for forgotten schooldays, Heather has discovered that Oscar' s brother, Willie, who attended Portora at the same time as his famous brother, won a prize for the high jump.

'I also learned that a fellow-pupil at the school was called Arbuthnot, which is a name that comes up in A Woman of No Importance,'' said Heather, providing a glimpse of what is still to come. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Profile: Heather White - Go Wilde for Oscar at the Weekend Festival; Project Oscar Wilde Is the Brainchild of Heather White Who, as ANNE PALMER Finds out, Has; a Passion for the 'Quirky' Side of the Man
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.