Nuclear Terrorism protection.(COMMENTARY)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 25, 2002 | Go to article overview

Nuclear Terrorism protection.(COMMENTARY)


Byline: Brett Wagne, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The events of September 11 sent an urgent wake up call that the United States should take very seriously the continuing efforts by terrorist groups to acquire nuclear weapons. Fortunately, Sen. Pete V. Domenici, New Mexico Republican, has heard that call and introduced a bill that could help prevent a nuclear September 11.

The State Department currently lists more than a dozen rogue states and terrorist organizations, including Osama bin Laden's al Qaeda, that are actively seeking nuclear weapons.

Russia's vast and undersecured stockpiles of excess fissile materials represent the most likely potential source of terrorist nuclear capability. According to U.S. intelligence agencies, Russian criminal groups are already supplying al Qaeda with components for nuclear weapons. All that's missing is the nuclear material itself.

In the days following the September 11 attacks, Russia's Federal Security Service reportedly thwarted an attempt by one of these criminal groups to sell stolen or diverted nuclear weapon-grade material to an unidentified buyer.

For several years, Russia has been hinting that it would be interested in selling these same nuclear materials to the United States for peaceful uses. Unfortunately, these hints have usually fallen on deaf ears.

Now, thanks to Mr. Domenici's leadership, we stand at the threshold of just such an agreement, and the timing could not be more critical.

Russia's Cold War-era nuclear stockpiles, which include 700 to 800 tons of highly enriched uranium and 150 to 200 tons of weapon-grade plutonium, pose a growing risk because of serious gaps in Moscow's nuclear security. Many of these scattered stockpiles are stored in makeshift warehouses, protected only by $5 combination locks or the equivalent. Small amounts of these materials have already been confiscated by European law enforcement officials from sellers looking for buyers.

It would take only 15 to 20 pounds of this uranium, or an even smaller amount of plutonium, to arm a device capable of leveling downtown Washington or lower Manhattan. Iraq and the terrorist group Islamic Jihad have each reportedly offered Russian workers enormous sums of money for enough nuclear material to produce a single weapon.

The blueprints and non-nuclear components necessary to build crude but highly effective nuclear weapons are readily available. The only component prohibitively difficult to develop or acquire is the nuclear material.

There is no reliable way of keeping a nuclear weapon or contraband from being smuggled into U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Nuclear Terrorism protection.(COMMENTARY)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.