Bias at Virginia Law schools?(COMMENTARY)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 25, 2002 | Go to article overview

Bias at Virginia Law schools?(COMMENTARY)


Byline: Roger Clegg, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Center for Equal Opportunity - a nonprofit, Sterling, Va.-based research and educational organization - is publishing today a 50-page study that documents evidence of racial and ethnic discrimination in the admissions policies of Virginia's three public law schools: the University of Virginia, William and Mary and George Mason University. This is the first analysis of this kind ever done for law-school admissions anywhere in the country.

The study is authored by Robert Lerner and Althea Nagai of Rockville, but all the data on which it relies were supplied by the three law schools themselves. The center obtained the data through freedom-of-information requests and turned it over to the Lerners, who did a sophisticated statistical analysis using multiple logistic regression equations. In layman's terms, they looked to see whether the data showed that skin color and ancestry influenced an applicant's chances of admission.

For two of the schools - Virginia and William and Mary - the evidence is overwhelming that race makes a huge difference. Indeed, the numbers for Virginia are the worst that the center has ever seen, having published studies looking at preferences for 47 undergraduate institutions across the country (including 10 in Virginia) and for six medical schools. The law-school and other studies are all available on the center's Web site, www.ceousa.org.

At Virginia, the odds favoring a black candidate over an equally qualified white candidate were an astonishing 731 to 1 in 1999 and 647 to 1 in 1998. To put it in other terms: In 1999, if you had an LSAT score of 160 and an undergraduate grade-point-average of 3.25 - these are the two measures that law schools typically weigh most heavily - you had a 95 percent chance of getting in if you were black, but only a 3 percent chance of getting in if you were white.

At William and Mary, there was also strong evidence of pronounced discrimination favoring black Americans. The odds ratio favoring blacks over whites there was 168 to 1 in 1999 and 351 to 1 in 1998. Thus, in 1999, if you had an LSAT of 155 and an undergraduate GPA of 3.0, your chances of getting in were 84 percent if you were black but only 3 percent if you were white. The black-white gap in GPA during the first-year of law school was greatest at William and Mary: six-tenths of a point on a 4-point scale.

Only George Mason University School of Law can plausibly claim to be treating black and white applicants on a nondiscriminatory basis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bias at Virginia Law schools?(COMMENTARY)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.