Word-of-Mouth Influences Women's Purchasing Habits. (Consumer Spending & Attitudes)

Marketing to Women: Addressing Women and Women's Sensibilities, April 2002 | Go to article overview

Word-of-Mouth Influences Women's Purchasing Habits. (Consumer Spending & Attitudes)


Women are significantly more likely than men to be influenced by word-of-mouth recommendations in their purchases, according to a Goodmind study of online adults. More than nine in 10 women (95%) are influenced by-word-of-mouth when making purchase decisions: 42% of women say word-of-mouth is extremely influential, compared with 33% of men who say so. Women are half as likely as men to say word-of-mouth has little or no influence on their purchases (6% of women versus 11% of men say so).

Women are also more likely than men to believe the influence of word-of-mouth recommendations has increased in the last three years. More than a third of women (35%) say word-of-mouth is more important than it was three years ago, compared with a quarter of men (25%) who think so.

Women make up 60% of "core" word-of-mouth consumers--those who believe word-of-mouth has increasing influence. While both women and men rely most on the opinions of friends and family members when making purchase decisions, women are much more likely than men to emphasize family members' opinions.

Women consider word-of-mouth recommendations to be most important when selecting restaurants, entertainment products and services, and cars. (See following table.)

Women are more likely than men to have purchased travel and packaged goods based on word-of-mouth. Men are more likely than women to have bought computers and electronics based on word-of-mouth. Among core word-of-mouth consumers, nearly twice as many women (21%) as men (13%) say word-of-mouth is the single most important factor in making automobile purchases.

While both women and men believe the influence of word-of-mouth has increased because of greater accessibility to the opinions of others (including online), women are more likely than men to cite factors such as the need to differentiate between a number of products that seem the same, being confused by marketing hype, and having less and less time to make purchase decisions. [CONSUMER SPENDING & ATTITUDES, OPINION, RETAIL/SERVICE SECTOR]

SOURCE

Goodmind, John Greenberg, VP, 1202 Lexington Ave., Ste. 341, New York, NY 10028; phone: 212-744-7438; e-mail: john.greenberg@goodmind.net; website: http://www.goodmind.net Price: Call for information.

SOURCES OF WORD-OF-MOUTH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PURCHASE DECISIONS, BY
GENDER

(Q: Which of the following sources do you rely on regularly for help in
making purchase decisions?)

Source                            Women  Men

Family members                     93%   76%
Friends and colleagues             91%   89%
Online customer ratings/opinions   37%   33%
Newsgroups/discussion boards       16%   14%
E-mail/newsletters                 12%    9%

Note: Multiple responses allowed. … 

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