Canada Has the Prescription for Making Drugs a Little Bit Cheaper

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 1, 2002 | Go to article overview

Canada Has the Prescription for Making Drugs a Little Bit Cheaper


Byline: Jack Mabley

Dialogues:

- I was on no medications when I was 82. None. Zero.

Today, at 86, I take five daily to maintain my good health.

It happens.

The cost of drugs is a major concern for many. Some war veterans go up to the Veterans Administration facility near Waukegan and get drugs at little cost.

It's a cumbersome process, but it saves a lot of money.

Many others buy prescription drugs by mail from Canada.

Chris Backe of Algonquin asked his pharmacist why Canada's prices are so low.

"First," he said, "the Canadian government puts a cap on the profits. Second, they are not allowed to advertise prescription drugs to the general public. The TV commercials and other advertising such as a four-page ad in Readers Digest can add as much as 30 percent to the cost."

Could those restrictions happen here? They could, but they won't.

- Chicago's aldermen want to raise their pay for their part time job to around $100,000 a year.

Gene O'Connell of Des Plaines asks: "Why is it that Chicago has 50 aldermen and Los Angeles, with a population larger than Chicago's, has only 12?"

He suggests reducing the number would save big bucks. I have a better idea. Get rid of all the aldermen and save more.

-"I thought I had seen it all with respect to the rudeness associated with cell phones," writes a reader from Atlanta.

"However, yesterday at a funeral for my friend, cell phones rang throughout the eulogy. It was sickening."

- Richard Frisbie of Arlington Heights, an old colleague, takes issue with my feeling that pornography should be blocked in public library computers.

"Most trustees and librarians are themselves parents," he notes. "Children's librarians are particularly devoted to the welfare of children. Otherwise they'd be working at something else, probably for higher pay.

"Too often the media have fallen for conservative propaganda, which promotes the unrealistic hope that filtering the Internet in libraries can solve the problem. …

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Canada Has the Prescription for Making Drugs a Little Bit Cheaper
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