State Labor Legislation Enacted in 1989

By Nelson, Richard R. | Monthly Labor Review, January 1990 | Go to article overview

State Labor Legislation Enacted in 1989


Nelson, Richard R., Monthly Labor Review


State labor legislation enacted in 1989

Major laws were enacted on a variety of subjects, including minimum wage, parental leave, drug and AIDS testing, and door-to-door sales by children

A sizable increase in the volume of labor standards legislation introduced and enacted by the States occurred in 1989.(1) In addition, several legislatures dealt with and enacted laws pertaining to difficult and sometimes controversial issues that have emerged in recent years, including parental leave, employee drug and AIDS testing, door-to-door sales by children, the effect of employment on school performance, genetic screening, and workplace smoking.

Attention was also given to minimum-wage protection and other traditional subjects, including bans on employment discrimination, collection of unpaid wages, and worker safety and health.(2) Wages. Again this year, minimum wage was a major subject of legislative activity. A first-time law was enacted in Iowa, and new actions increased rates in Arkansas, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin, and in Puerto Rico for employees of the restaurant, bar, and soda fountain industry. Rates also increased as the result of prior action in six other jurisdictions (Maine, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Vermont, the Virgin Islands, and Washington [1988 ballot initiative]). Measures linking State rates to future Federal rate increases were adopted in Delaware, Illinois, Montana (up to $4.00 an hour), and Nevada. In Missouri, a State without a minimum-wage law, a bill that would have enacted a law with a rate linked to the Federal rate was vetoed.

Under a new law signed by the President on November 17, 1989, the Federal minimum wage will increase to $3.80 on April 1, 1990, with a further increase to $4.25 scheduled for April 1, 1991. Beginning April 1, 1990, employers will be permitted, under certain conditions, to pay workers under 20 years of age a subminimum training wage of not less than $3.35 an hour for up to 90 days. Beginning April 1, 1991, this sum will change to not less than the greater of $3.35 or 85 percent of the minimum wage. Payment of the training wage is permitted for an additional 90 days with any other employer where the youths are in approved on-the-job training programs. Among other changes, new amendments exempt enterprises with annual gross volume of sales of less than $500,000 and increase the maximum allowable tip credit from 40 percent of the applicable minimum-wage rate to 45 percent on April 1, 1990, and to 50 percent after March 31, 1991. (A bill which would have raised the Federal rate in three annual steps to $4.55 by October 1, 1991, and included a temporary training wage for up to 60 days cumulative for all employers was vetoed on June 13, 1989.)

Measures adopted in Delaware (for minors under age 18), Iowa, Montana, North Dakota, and Wisconsin provide for subminimum training rates, also.

By April 1, 1990, rates for ten States and three other jurisdictions(3) will exceed the $3.80 Federal rate for some or all employees. Vermont will exceed $3.80 on July 2, 1990, and New Hampshire on January 1, 1991. California, Connecticut, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Washington now have rates of $4.25 an hour. The District of Columbia and the Virgin Islands exceed $4.25 for some or all workers, and future increases scheduled in Oregon (January 1, 1991) and Iowa (January 1, 1992) will raise rates to $4.75 and $4.65, respectively.

Among other significant minimum-wage and overtime actions, coverage of the Oregon law was extended to persons regulated under the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act, most agricultural workers, industrial homeworkers, and private household employees working on a noncasual basis. In North Carolina, persons employed in enterprises with fewer than three employees will no longer be exempt from minimum-wage, overtime, and recordkeeping provisions. In Arkansas, the minimum-wage law was expanded to cover employers of four or more, rather than five or more, employees. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

State Labor Legislation Enacted in 1989
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.