Mayor Defends Fund Raising; Answers Leave Some perplexed.(METROPOLITAN)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 2, 2002 | Go to article overview

Mayor Defends Fund Raising; Answers Leave Some perplexed.(METROPOLITAN)


Byline: Brian DeBose, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Mayor Anthony A. Williams, testifying before the D.C. Council yesterday, defended his administration against charges of improper and illegal fund raising - but the mayor's explanations left several council members unconvinced.

The mayor appeared before the council's Committee on Government Matters yesterday against the advice of his attorneys to answer question about his knowledge of and involvement in the improper and possibly illegal use of $1.5 million to fund political receptions and special events.

Every seat in the council chambers was full - mostly with Mr. Williams' supporters - for the hearing. Each council member was limited to seven minutes of direct questioning of the mayor, and several came away frustrated by what they considered his long-winded or evasive answers.

"I am not totally satisfied [with Mr. Williams' answers]," said Vincent B. Orange Sr., Ward 5 Democrat, who chairs the committee.

Mr. Orange attempted to paint Mr. Wiliams into a corner by reminding him of a comment he made in 1997 when he was the District's chief financial officer.

According to Mr. Orange, Mr. Williams at that time was critical of Mayor Marion Barry for using nonprofit corporations to raise money for special events and projects. Mr. Williams, according to Mr. Orange, had said such activities were illegal and unethical.

The mayor avoided making any comparisons to his own solicitation of funds from private donors with that of Mr. Barry in his answer.

"Since the events of a year ago, we've issued rules and regulations so we can properly and in a good way raise funds and that is a reflection of those 1997 comments," Mr. Williams said.

The council hearing was prompted by the conclusions of a D.C. inspector general's investigation into fund-raising irregularities in the mayor's office. Mr. Williams said he and his staff were unaware of laws on how funds from private donors should be accounted for and accepted.

Or, he said, in some cases laws did not exist to regulate such activity.

Mr. Orange said there have always been laws covering the government's ability to solicit and accept funds from nonprofits and private donors. He said Mr. Williams' comments from five years ago reflect that the mayor was fully aware of the laws and simply ignored them. …

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Mayor Defends Fund Raising; Answers Leave Some perplexed.(METROPOLITAN)
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