A New Strategy for Latin America

The World and I, April 2002 | Go to article overview

A New Strategy for Latin America


Most modern American presidents have been content to take Latin America for granted, bestirring themselves only in a crisis as when John F. Kennedy prevented the installation of Soviet nuclear missiles in Cuba in the 1960s and Ronald Reagan supported the Contras against the Marxist Sandinistas in Nicaragua in the 1980s. President George W. Bush has the opportunity and seemingly the desire to chart a more interdependent course for U.S.--Latin American relations.

Bush's timing is fortunate because Latin America is on the verge of becoming the United States' second-largest trading partner and is competing with the Middle East as a major petroleum supplier. On the debit side, drug trafficking and crime networks have spread from Colombia both north and south. Several Latin American countries seem close to returning to old-style caudillo-led oligarchies.

At the same time, illegal immigration, particularly from Mexico, is increasing. Radical leftist groups met in Havana last December and vowed to fight against free trade and the U.S.-led war against terrorism.

A year ago, a Summit of the Americas, held in Quebec, addressed these and other problems, but little progress has been made. There is a need to implement a U.S.--Latin American strategy that will strengthen weak democracies, develop a modern security program to handle new threats like terrorism, and expand trade and economic reform.

While democracy and economic freedom have brought political stability and growing prosperity to much of Latin America over the last two decades, writes Michael G. Wilson of the International Republican Institute, there are multiplying signs of disillusionment and unrest across the continent. Argentina's economic and political collapse indicates the severity of the potential crisis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A New Strategy for Latin America
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.