Drill Tests Students' Training

By Grusich, Kate | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 10, 2002 | Go to article overview

Drill Tests Students' Training


Grusich, Kate, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Kate Grusich Daily Herald Staff Writer

The call came in around 1:45 p.m. Thursday, signaling an accident in an auto collision repair shop.

When rescue squads descended on the scene, they found the mangled bodies of six people, many suffering from severe injuries and groaning for assistance.

There were broken limbs, bodies impaled by glass shards and lots of blood.

But fortunately, for the victims and rescue personnel, it was all fake.

The scenario was a mock disaster drill, designed to test the proficiency of about 20 students in the Emergency Medical Service Program at the Lake County High Schools Technology Campus in Grayslake.

"It's a really good test of their skills and what they have learned," said Ruth Schiller, a medical assistance teacher at the campus. She added that students participating in the course can be viewed as more marketable in the emergency field because a fire department would have to pay $400 to $500 for the same training.

The annual drill wraps up the nine-month program, testing students' knowledge, skills and cooperation. It was up to them to assess the situation, call for help and work as quickly as possible to help the wounded.

From wrapping gauze around bleeding body parts to placing the injured onto backboards and stretchers, the high school students took about 40 minutes to complete the session, which ended with them loading patients into ambulances.

The "victims" were played by students in the auto collision repair course at the campus. The incident allegedly began when the wheel on a car exploded, blowing glass shards and debris onto employees standing nearby. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Drill Tests Students' Training
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.