FOOTBALL: NOW NOBODY CAN SPEND IT LIKE BECKHAM; David's New Deal Toe-Tals 90 Grand a Week

The People (London, England), May 12, 2002 | Go to article overview

FOOTBALL: NOW NOBODY CAN SPEND IT LIKE BECKHAM; David's New Deal Toe-Tals 90 Grand a Week


WHAT a day for David Beckham. First he signed his new four-year contract... then he went running for the first time since breaking a foot.

The deal is good news for his bank manager, as well as Sir Alex Ferguson, who CUDDLED his midfielder on the pitch as details of the contract were confirmed.

The jogging is good news for the rest of the nation as Beckham prepares to return to the England team heading for the World Cup.

Amid the sushi and saki being nibbled and quaffed at Beckingham Palace in Hertfordshire today, the Manchester United star will be certain of one thing - no footballer at the pre-World Cup bash will be taking home a bigger wage packet than him.

Okay, Elton John and a sprinkling of other A-list celebs at the swanky Japanese-themed knees-up may have the edge over Becks at the bank - but on a British football field the United star has the biggest wad of all.

The England skipper ensured that yesterday when he put pen to paper on a pounds 90,000-a-week deal.

Arsenal may have the trophies... Beckham has the money.

Of course, he would swap a few bob for a title medal this season but at least his brand spanking new contract will help soothe the agony of a season without success.

And Beckham warned the champions from North London: "Arsenal deserve it because they've played well all season - but we'll bounce back.''

The deal is the most detailed in English football history.

There is the pounds 65,000-a-week rise, pounds 2.5m wages back-dated to the start of season and image rights, which may see Becks cash in every time United sell a bed-spread, key ring or poster.

And he revealed: "United were the only club I wanted to play for. The club has bent over backwards.

"I was never really worried about the contract but I did want it all sorted out before the World Cup."

Beckham then stepped up his fitness routine as he prepares to join his England team-mates on the plane to Dubai tomorrow for a World Cup jolly. His fitness will be regularly monitored, but the joke around Old Trafford yesterday was that he would be more likely to strain a muscle picking up his wallet than worry about his damage digit. …

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