Culture of Cooperation and Not Politics of greed.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)

Manila Bulletin, May 14, 2002 | Go to article overview

Culture of Cooperation and Not Politics of greed.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)


Byline: FRED M. LOBO

WE need greater awakening and reforms in the political front for the country to recover and move faster.

For how can we soar to greater heights like a robust eagle when our leaders and politicians are themselves confused and divided?

Politics being the art of governing, public officials must, aside from competence and vision, be guided by a strong sense of service and cooperation, and not by indifference, greed nor "power intoxication."

It is good though that some of our leaders have seen the light recently at the All-Political Parties Summit at the historic Manila Hotel, less the boycotters who still looked like sourgrapes despite their good reasons. For haven't the Republicans and Democrats joined forces and forged muchneed cooperation in the wake of the World Trade Center bombing and subsequent security and economic problems that gripped the US?

What are interesting to note in the "united declaration" of the participants are their vow to adopt a new culture of cooperation among political parties and their declaration of war against politics of hate, bickering, discord, suspicion and character assassination - which all boil down to politics of selfish interest or greed.

Answering an earlier call of President Macapagal Arroyo, participants have also vowed to fight all forms of destabilization against the government and adopt a common national agenda that is beneficial to the country in the midst of the economic hardships.

"The summit is historic as the parties present rose above partisanship to discuss the country's problems and propose probable solutions," Vice President Teofisto Guingona has noted. …

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