Magic Touch for Mystics? Stanley Determined to Lead Team into playoffs.(SPORTS)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 16, 2002 | Go to article overview

Magic Touch for Mystics? Stanley Determined to Lead Team into playoffs.(SPORTS)


Byline: Duff Durkin, THE WASHINGTON TIME

This winter, when Susan O'Malley was interviewing candidates to fill the Washington Mystics' coaching vacancy, she was taken aback by what she heard from applicants.

"Why aren't you looking at Marianne?" some asked, referring to Marianne Stanley, an assistant coach with the team last season.

The questions seemed strange to O'Malley, in her first foray into the coach selection process after spending years dealing only with the business side as president of Washington Sports & Entertainment. If competitors for the position were almost supporting Stanley's candidacy, O'Malley thought, why was she even looking at anybody else?

"[I] started to think, 'You're an idiot. How hard is it [to choose Stanley]?'" O'Malley said.

O'Malley went with the obvious choice to replace coach Tom Maher, under whom the Mystics went 10-22 last season, and so far Stanley - with the input of newly hired personnel consultant Pat Summit - has so impressed the entire Mystics organization that it is abuzz with talk of the team's first winning season and a deep run into the WNBA playoffs. The Mystics open the season June1 at home against Orlando.

"Marianne is in it to win it," O'Malley said. "She says it all the time, and everybody believes it."

Stanley would also say if such playoff talk is premature because - as her players already know - she doesn't mince words. She is very direct and honest in dealing with her players, and always lets them know where they stand. It's a method that doesn't always give players what they want to hear, but one that never leaves anything misunderstood, either.

"When you meet coach Stanley, you get the real deal, the raw deal. You get Marianne and everything she is," said rookie guard Stacey Dales-Schuman. "She doesn't hide anything. I love her honesty and her directness. There's no sugarcoating, and I appreciate that as a player."

Dales-Schuman said players got a first-hand dose of Stanley's up-front personality when it was time to make the season's first cuts last week. After the players who were cut met privately with Stanley, the coach told the team at practice why the players were cut and what they needed to do to make the squad. It was unusual for a coach to do that, Dales-Schuman said, but refreshing. "If you're not doing something right, you're told," she said. "If you are doing something right, you're also told. It's a continuous communication line that she keeps open."

But for Stanley, the lines of communication weren't always open when it came to coaching. For an 18-month period between 1993 and 1994, Stanley, who won three national titles in seven seasons at Old Dominion, couldn't get a job as a coach.

Stanley coached at Southern California from 1989 to 1993, but after she rejected a pay increase and her contract was not renewed after the 1992-93 season, she sued the school for sex discrimination over the discrepancy in her salary to the men's coach, George Raveling. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Magic Touch for Mystics? Stanley Determined to Lead Team into playoffs.(SPORTS)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.