Football: Hampden Roarsome Once more.(Sport)

Sunday Mirror (London, England), May 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

Football: Hampden Roarsome Once more.(Sport)


Byline: RAY HEPBURN

HAMPDEN came of age once again on Wednesday evening when the new, trimmer, slimmer but smarter National Stadium contributed to an unforgettable night of European football.

In 1960, the legendary steep slopes of the original stadium were packed with 135,000 fans as Real Madrid beat Eintracht 7-3, in arguably the greatest final of all time.

Sixteen years later Bayern Munich and St Etienne could attract only 54,864 as the Germans won the trophy in a half-empty stadium.

That rather spikes Sir Alex Ferguson's view that the refurbished ground is too small and that 70,000 seats were needed to make Hampden a vital, modern facility.

Despite Bayer Leverkuson returning 3,000 tickets in the week before the game, Scottish fans, including myself, avidly too up the slack to ensure that the match was a sell-out.

In recent years, 47,500 saw Real defeat Juventus in Amsterdam, 49,730 enjoyed Ajax's 1-0 win over AC Milan in Vienna, and 46,00 were present when Aston Villa won in Rotterdam in 1982.

Those were all matches that Hampden could have comfortably contained, and all the evidence from Wednesday's slick show points to further feature matches coming to Scotland.

There have been suggestions that the gradual gradient precludes atmosphere and that viewing is difficult because the slope does not afford the seated fan enough height above the one in front.

Well on Wednesday night I sat wedged between the very faithful and vociferous German supporters and the exuberant Real followers at what should become known as the Zinedine Zidane end.

Access and egress was swift, orderly and well supervised while the pre-match entertainment had the crowd at fever pitch in time for the kick off. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Football: Hampden Roarsome Once more.(Sport)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.