BOXING: PRINCE NAZ-BEEN JEERED TO VICTORY; LAST NIGHT'S BIG FIGHT ACTION.(Sport)

Sunday Mirror (London, England), May 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

BOXING: PRINCE NAZ-BEEN JEERED TO VICTORY; LAST NIGHT'S BIG FIGHT ACTION.(Sport)


Byline: STEVE ROYCE

NASEEM HAMED was booed from the ring last night after winning the IBO featherweight title at the London Arena in Docklands.

Hamed dominated every round against Spain's Manuel Calvo but the crowd booed from the end of round four.

From the end of round five, hundreds of fans started leaving the arena at the end of each round.

Hamed has been out of the ring for 13 months and his ring-rust was evident from the start.

Even when it was over and the former legend from Sheffield had been declared the new champion, hundreds stayed behind to jeer him.

There were screams of "refund, refund" from the end of round six and even Hamed looked embarrassed by his career-worst performance.

It is possible that Hamed took less than six or seven punches in the entire 12 rounds but there were long periods in rounds when neither boxer even bothered to throw a punch.

Even Hamed's long exile from the ring cannot possibly explain last nights truly atrocious and insulting performance.

There was nothing to distinguish any of the rounds and that is why the crowd of more than 14,000 were so restless last night.

"You're sh*t and you know you are," they chanted during round 10.

There was nothing that Hamed's long-suffering trainer Oscar Suarez could possibly do to motivate Hamed and he must surely take some of the blame. Hamed often missed by three or four feet with his wild and desperate lunges and had Calvo possessed a punch it could have really hurt Hamed.

Last April Hamed lost his unbeaten record when he was beaten over 12 rounds by Marco Antonio Barrera in a world title fight in Las Vegas. …

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