D.C. Report: Public/private Partnerships Aiding Cities. (Public-Private Partnership)

Nation's Cities Weekly, May 13, 2002 | Go to article overview

D.C. Report: Public/private Partnerships Aiding Cities. (Public-Private Partnership)


WASHINGTON, DC--As governments at the state, local and federal level are faced with increased service demands and infrastructure needs, they are increasingly turning to partnerships with the private sector to provide vital services to their constituencies. A report issued by a Washington-based non-partisan organization says these partnerships are not without controversy, but that the public has benefited significantly from them.

The report, "For the Good of the People: Using Public-Private Partnerships to Meet America's Essential Needs" was released by The National Council for Public-Private Partnerships (NCPPP). The report states, "Without the use of public-private partnerships, many elected officials will be faced with choosing between harmful reductions in services and significant tax increases. By being innovative and forging new ways of providing vital services, governments are proving that public-private partnerships are a practical and viable alternative that, in many eases, maintain quality services without significant tax increases."

The NCPPP report examines the impact of a wide variety of public-private partnerships throughout the country, finding that:

* Increasingly, school districts are forming partnerships with the private sector to build schools in communities where school buildings are dilapidated and inadequate to meet growing student populations.

* States are turning to public-private partnerships to help address the congestion and growing decay of the nation's roadways, working with these private firms to build new highways and tell roads.

* With local governments financially hard-pressed to meet the expensive mandates of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act, partnerships are being developed with private companies to improve and operate water and wastewater facilities. …

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