Gene Clue to Why Women Pick Brains over Brawn

By Chapman, James | Daily Mail (London), May 23, 2002 | Go to article overview

Gene Clue to Why Women Pick Brains over Brawn


Chapman, James, Daily Mail (London)


Byline: JAMES CHAPMAN

IF YOU are one of those men who looks in the mirror in the morning and doesn't like what he sees, take heart.

Women are genetically programmed to pick brains over brawn when it comes to choosing a mate, say scientists.

The female of the species is, the experts say, responsible for the intelligence of the human race.

Historically, women have spurned the bronzed Adonis and instead plumped for men with wit and intelligence, according to a report published today.

The theory might help explain how balding, bearded author Salman Rushdie ? no oil painting in anyone's book, but acknowledged as a giant of literature ? managed to charm the model Padma Lakshmi.

Or why Marilyn Monroe found the bespectacled playwright Arthur Miller, who was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1949, sufficiently beguiling to marry.

German geneticists say by favouring intelligence over strength and looks, our female ancestors set in motion a process that, over thou-'Humanity should be grateful' sands of years, has developed the modern human brain.

Dr Horst Hameister and Dr Ulrich Zechner, of the University of Ulm, claim to have found evidence that the way women select men means the human race has built up more and more genes for intelligence.

Their sexual selection process, running hand in hand with the fact that brighter individuals are more likely to survive anyway, has resulted in a tripling in the size of the human brain over 2.5million years, say the scientists.

Other studies have indicated that women prefer brain over brawn when selecting a mate. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gene Clue to Why Women Pick Brains over Brawn
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.