Bringing Space Down to Earth: Susan Johnson Head of Government Affairs at Astrium, the UK and Europe's Largest Space Technology Company, Examines the Case for Government Funding for Space Programmes

By Johnson, Susan | New Statesman (1996), May 20, 2002 | Go to article overview

Bringing Space Down to Earth: Susan Johnson Head of Government Affairs at Astrium, the UK and Europe's Largest Space Technology Company, Examines the Case for Government Funding for Space Programmes


Johnson, Susan, New Statesman (1996)


Gordon Brown's 2002 Budget marked a significant turning point in modern British politics. Instead of focusing on tax cuts, he increased direct taxation.

Despite the fact that more money is available, the battle for funds is intense. In this environment, the space sector has to work hard in order to justify its worth. Many argue that space is an expensive diversion.

However, such sceptics are missing the point. The goal of the space sector is, as with any other publicly funded area, to deliver real benefits for real people. Far from being on the periphery of the chancellor's focus, space must be recognised as a key tool in helping the government to deliver.

In practice, the space sector has been delivering tangible benefits for many years. As well as direct results, space technologies provide important spin-offs. Space travel demands strong, lightweight materials that are heat and impact resistant. These have quickly found terrestrial applications, which improve safety and security. Space sensing and imaging technologies have helped scientists diagnose disease with bio-imagery.

The security services were an early adopter of space technologies. The majority of the UK and NATO's long-distance strategic and tactical communications are carried by spacecraft designed and manufactured in the UK. The next generation of communications systems will offer multi-media services including real-time tactical imagery and videoconferencing facilities, as well as telephone, e-mail and internet access for all troops in the field. Besides up-to-the-minute high-resolution images from all-weather, day-and-night, space-borne radars, highly accurate third-generation satellite navigation systems will enable instant co-ordination of ships, aircraft and artillery.

Defence expenditure has helped to bring benefits to the domestic scene, too. High-resolution images and other information from low-orbit satellites will prove invaluable for environmental monitoring, town planning, agricultural supervision and disaster management.

The UK government is funding the development of a new European satellite navigation service. Acting alongside existing systems, this will provide far greater accuracy than at present, opening up new possibilities for traffic management. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bringing Space Down to Earth: Susan Johnson Head of Government Affairs at Astrium, the UK and Europe's Largest Space Technology Company, Examines the Case for Government Funding for Space Programmes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.