Women with Kids Shop for Bargains Online; Women without Kids Shop Brands

Marketing to Women: Addressing Women and Women's Sensibilities, May 2002 | Go to article overview

Women with Kids Shop for Bargains Online; Women without Kids Shop Brands


Some aspects of women's online behavior are determined as much by whether they have children as by their income level, according to Jupiter Research. While the amount of online spending is always tied to income level, the presence of children in the household also has an effect.

Women with children spend less money online and shop in fewer product categories than do childless women. Nearly two thirds (63%) of women without kids spent over $100 online in the three months prior to the study, while only 53% of women with kids spent as much during that time. (See chart on page 6.)

Women with children are more likely than those without kids to say they watch less TV because they are spending time on the Internet. Four in 10 women with kids (44%) say their TV usage has declined as a result of spending time online, compared with 37% of childless women who say so. Most women, however, say they watch about the same amount of TV regardless of Internet usage: 60% of childless women and 54% of women with kids say so.

Women without children are more likely than those with children to use the Internet for making travel arrangements, getting stock quotes, and finding information on local events. Women with children are more likely than those without them to visit adult websites, play games online, and download music.

The top online activities of women both with and without kids are e-mail (96% of women without kids and 95% of women with kids use it monthly), search engines (78% of women without kids and 72% of those with kids use them monthly), and electronic greeting cards or postcards (74% of women without kids and 71% of women with kids use them monthly).

Women with children are more likely than those without children to use online coupons for most product categories, with the exception of travel services, books, automotive care, and apparel.

Even offline, women with kids are more bargain-driven and less brand-conscious than those without children.

As of 2002, more than half of U.S. women (54%) are online; seven in 10 are expected to be online by 2006. More than eight in 10 women age 18-34 (85%) and 35-49 (81%) will be online by 2006.

Contrary to the popular image of Internet users as affluent, the majority (71%) of online women live in low- to middle-income households. Low-income women (earning $40,000 or less per year) without children make up the largest group of women online, accounting for 23% of the female online population. Middle-income ($40,000-$75,000) women with children (19%) and without children (17%) make up the next-largest groups of women online. [ONLINE, HUMAN BEHAVIOR]

SOURCE

"Demographic Profile: Women Online, 2002," Rachel Terrace, Lead Analyst, Jupiter Research, 21 Astor Pl., New York, NY 10003; phone: 212-780-6060; website: http://www.jmm.com Price: Call for information.

Online Spending In Past Three Months, By Women With And Without Children

                  Women without  Women with
                    children      children

$50 or less            15%          19%
$51-$100               20%          28%
$101-$500              45%          41%
$501-$1,000            13%           9%
More than $1,000        5%           3%

Source: Jupiter Research

Note: Table made from bar graph
Online Activities Women Without Children Do More Frequently Than Women
With Children

                     Women without  Women with
                       children      children

Find local events         63%          53%
Travel arrangements       54%          38%
Read newspaper            47%          37%
Research for work         41%          33%
Find stock quotes         20%          13%

* Activities done monthly or more frequently

Source: Jupiter Research

Note: Table made from bar graph
Online Activities Women With Children Do More Frequently Than Women
Without Children

                          Women without  Women with
                            children      children

Homework/school research       24%          40%
Online games                   22%          29%
Download music                 24%          29%
Visit music website            30%          34%
Visit adult website             6%          10%

* Activities done monthly or more frequently

Source: Jupiter Research

Note: Table made from bar graph
ONLINE COUPON USAGE * BY WOMEN WITH AND WITHOUT CHILDREN

                        Without  With
Category                 kids    kids

Food                      37%    50%
Household products        34%    43%
Books/music               31%    25%
Cosmetics                 30%    32%
Personal care products    26%    37%
Apparel/footwear          22%    21%
Travel                    10%     7%
Automotive care            6%     4%

* Have ever used an online coupon in that category

Sources: Jupiter Research, NPD Group
ATTITUDES TOWARD BRANDS AND SHOPPING, WOMEN WITH AND WITHOUT CHILDREN

(% who say the statement describes their attitude)

                                    Women   Women
                                   without  with
                                    kids    kids

I find the best deals                65%     69%
When satisfied with a product, I     64%     60%
 buy other items from the company
I buy things on sale that I          35%     41%
 wouldn't buy otherwise
I buy well-known brands, even if     34%     27%
 means paying more
More expensive products are          22%     18%
 generally of better quality
Brands reflect my personality        20%     14%
I prefer brands priced a little      10%      4%
 beyond my means

Sources: Jupiter Research, NPD Group
NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF U. … 

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Women with Kids Shop for Bargains Online; Women without Kids Shop Brands
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.