Keynote Address: Terrorism and Globalization; an International Perspective

By Lim, Linda | Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law, March 2002 | Go to article overview

Keynote Address: Terrorism and Globalization; an International Perspective


Lim, Linda, Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law


My talk today will address two questions: first, what has terrorism to do with globalization; and second, what have corporations, and corporate governance, to do with peace.

TERRORISM AND GLOBALIZATION

The answer to the first question is easy. Terrorism has little or nothing to do with globalization, just as it has little or nothing to do with Islam. Most of the many varieties of terrorism that afflict and have long afflicted the world are responses not to global phenomena, but to intensely local ones. Examples include particularly ethnic, nationalist, and religious fault lines such as violence by Catholics and Protestants in Ireland; Basques in Spain; the Hindu Tamil Tigers in Sri Lanka; Kashmiris, Sikhs, and Hindu nationalists in India; the Aum cult in Japan; and Uighurs in Xinjiang, China.

The terrorists who attacked the World Trade Center on September 11 were also not making a statement against globalization, unlike the anti-globalization activist who leads French farmers in trashing McDonald's outlets there. (1) Rather, as far as can be discerned from the propaganda of the hijackers' assumed leader, Osama bin Laden, they were making a statement against, variously, the U.S. military presence in Saudi Arabia, (2) its insistence on continued bombing of and economic sanctions against Iraq, (3) and its support of Israel against the Palestinians. (4) In my experience, and from what I read, these same resentments are felt by most Muslims everywhere, who nonetheless condemn terrorism and recognize it to be counter to the teachings of Islam. On October 10, the sixty countries which belong to the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC), unambiguously declared of the September 11 attacks that "such deplorable terrorist acts run counter to Islam's tolerant heavenly message of peace, harmony, tolerance, and respect among people.... Islam values human life and denounces the killing of innocent people." (5)

Islam itself is not against globalization, capitalism, the West, or the enfranchisement of women, contrary to what many editorialists in the Western press proclaim. (6) Rather, Islam was spread by globalization in earlier eras, including by Arab traders who ventured into Southeast Asia beginning in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. (7) Islam has always been a religion of world trade and of world traders. The Prophet Mohammed's wife was herself a trader, whose market-derived wealth enabled him to concentrate his efforts on preaching and spreading the religion. (8) And it was Muslim traders' control of the lucrative spice trade between South and Southeast Asia and Western Europe that motivated the European Age of Exploration, which has landed everyone here today.

Today, many of those throughout the Muslim world--one hundred thirty million each in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, two hundred million in Indonesia, perhaps another two hundred million in all of Africa, together outnumber Arab Muslims by almost three to one (9)--who share the above-mentioned grievances about U.S. foreign policy, are highly-educated, even Western-educated professionals and business executives. (10) These highly-educated Muslims study in U.S. MBA program and read the Quran online. The women among them work and occupy leadership positions in society. (11) Muslim women leaders include a past prime minister of Turkey, (12) a past president of Pakistan, (13) the current and past presidents of Bangladesh, (14) and the current president of Indonesia. (15) In Malaysia today--where nearly two-thirds of all Muslim college students are women (16)--the Governor of the Central Bank, the Solicitor-General are Muslim women, as is the Minister of Trade and Industry, who is the most senior cabinet minister besides the prime minister and a tireless promoter of foreign investment, are all Muslim. This is a record of female political and economic leadership that Western countries individually and collectively cannot match. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Keynote Address: Terrorism and Globalization; an International Perspective
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.