National Aviation Hall of Fame. (News)

Air Power History, Summer 2002 | Go to article overview

National Aviation Hall of Fame. (News)


The National Aviation Hall of Fame's (NAHF) 41st Annual Enshrinement Ceremony will take place in Dayton, Ohio, on Saturday, July 20, 2002, when four more outstanding pioneers of aviation will take their place of honor among the 174 men and women previously enshrined. Often referred to as the "Oscar Night of Aviation," the black tie gala is held in the Dayton Convention Center and draws hundreds of aerospace, military government and industry leaders, as well as NAHF members and previous enshrinees.

Prior to the formal events, on Friday, July 19, the NAHF will also present the Milton Caniff Spirit of Flight Award to the American Eagle Squadrons during the NAHF President's Reception and Dinner, held at the NAHF Learning and Research Center and United States Air Force Museum, in Dayton. Eagle Squadron fighter pilots are remembered for their voluntarily bolstering the ranks of Great Britain's battle weary Royal Air Force prior the United States' entry into World War II. The four individual enshrinees being honored in 2002 for their achievements and lifelong contributions to aviation are pilots and Vietnam heroes, Richard "Dick" Rutan, and James B. Stockdale, as well as World War II ace and tactician Hubert "Hub" Zemke, and helicopter designer and pilot Frank N. Piasecki.

Philadelphia native Frank Piasecki, founder and head of the PV-Engineering Forum, made America's second successful helicopter flight in the PV-2 in April 1943. He and his forum then built the world's first tandem rotor helicopter, known as "the flying banana" for the Navy. By 1946, the Piasecki Helicopter Corporation was producing and designing helicopters for the U.S. Navy, Army and Army Air Forces as well as the Canadian and French navies. Piasecki continues to devote his time and energy improving the Apache and Super Cobra helicopters.

As an Air Force fighter pilot, Dick Rutan of Loma Linda, California, flew 325 combat missions in Vietnam, of which 105 were classified as high risk. Following his Air Force retirement, at the rank of lieutenant colonel, he flew flight test development programs and set numerous speed and distance records. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

National Aviation Hall of Fame. (News)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.