The "Emancipated" Child: The UN Aims to Free Children from Parental Authority and Make Them Wards of the State, a Move That Will Abolish the Family and Leave Children Vulnerable to Sexual Exploitation. (Child Grab)

By Grigg, William Norman | The New American, June 3, 2002 | Go to article overview

The "Emancipated" Child: The UN Aims to Free Children from Parental Authority and Make Them Wards of the State, a Move That Will Abolish the Family and Leave Children Vulnerable to Sexual Exploitation. (Child Grab)


Grigg, William Norman, The New American


Parents in every country can testify that trying to restrain the hormonal impulses of teenagers can be like trying to lasso a locomotive. But special challenges confront traditionalist parents in Holland.

Graphic pornography is peddled openly in Dutch supermarkets and newsstands; graphic nudity is a staple of prime-time television. Prostitution and homosexual "marriage" are legal in Holland, and hard narcotics are available in so-called coffee houses. However, the most formidable obstacle for Dutch parents seeking to guide their teenagers through the minefield of Dutch popular culture is the central government's "Council for the Protection of Children" (CPC).

The April 13th New York Times noted that Dutch parents trying to prevent a teenager from becoming promiscuous "can overrule their child's wishes only if they persuade the Council for the Protection of Children that they are acting in the child's best interest."

In the Netherlands, the official age of consent for sexual activity is 16. But as the Holland Sentinel has reported, Holland's age-of-consent law "permits sex between an adult and a young person between 12 and 16 if the young person consents. Prosecutions for coercive sex may be sought by the young person or the youth's parents." But under Dutch law, parents have no clearly defined power to prevent or terminate "consensual" sexual relations between a 12-year-old child and an adult -- much to the delight of that nation's homosexual lobby.

Not surprisingly, the Dutch Association for the Integration of Homosexuality played a key role in lowering that nation's age of consent. A brochure produced by the group explains: "In the 'shady' area between 12 and 16 sexual contacts are punishable only when a complaint is lodged.... [O]nly the child itself [sic], his or her parents and the Council for the Protection of Children may bring in charges."

But what if the child -- say, a 12-year-old boy lured into a homosexual relationship -- doesn't want to end the "relationship"? The brochure points out that "the Council assumes authority in case the situation within the family has got out of hand or when children and parents see no way of coping with the situation. Usually the Council will first try and find a solution with the help of social workers and therapists. Should the Council fail to see any feasible solutions, it may decide to contact the Justice Department." So while it is possible to prosecute Dutch adults who seduce children, prosecution is apparently the final option.

Under Dutch law, concludes the pamphlet, "nobody is allowed to interfere" with adult-child homosexual contacts "as long as the situation is mutually agreeable, but should problems arise, then the sexual relation is certainly punishable." In other words, it's open season for Dutch homosexuals to prey upon 12-year-olds, as long as they're careful.

Holland's sexual "emancipation" model for youngsters has been cited by Judith Levine, author of the controversial new book Harmful to Minors: The Perils of Protecting Children from Sex, as an enlightened alternative to America's conventional moral standards. According to Levine, "the threat of pedophilia and molestation is exaggerated by adults, who want to deny young people the opportunity for positive sexual experiences." She also insists: "The research shows us that in some minority of cases, young -- even quite young -- people can have positive [sexual] experience with an adult." "America's drive to protect kids from sex is protecting them from nothing," insists Levine. "Instead, often it is harming them."

With a foreword by former Surgeon General Jocelyn Elders, Levine's book has triggered an outpouring of protest by traditionalists and an equally effusive outpouring of praise from the academic establishment. Stephanie Dallam of the Leadership Council for Mental Health, Justice and the Media observes that the sexual revolution leaders and foot soldiers "view children as the next sexual frontier. …

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