Southern Injustice: The Chief Justice of Alabama Calls Homosexuality "An Inherent Evil," and a Mississippi Judge Says Gay People Should Be Institutionalized. Can Equal Justice Be Found South of the Mason-Dixon Line? (Court)

By Freiberg, Peter | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), June 11, 2002 | Go to article overview

Southern Injustice: The Chief Justice of Alabama Calls Homosexuality "An Inherent Evil," and a Mississippi Judge Says Gay People Should Be Institutionalized. Can Equal Justice Be Found South of the Mason-Dixon Line? (Court)


Freiberg, Peter, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


Coming from the state's top jurist, the words of Alabama supreme court chief justice Roy Moore were extraordinary even for the Bible Belt. Adding his concurring opinion to the court's decision in a gay parent's custody case. in February, Moore stated that homosexuality is "an inherent evil, an act so heinous that it defies one's ability to describe it."

The "homosexual conduct of a parent," Moore asserted, is sufficient justification for denying him or her custody of a child; simply exposing children to such behavior "has a destructive and seriously detrimental effect." Homosexuality is "abhorrent, immoral, detestable, a crime against nature," Moore stated, and government has the power "to prohibit conduct with physical penalties, such as confinement and even execution."

The comments by Moore, who first gained notoriety as a circuit judge who insisted on hanging a plaque of the Ten Commandments in his courtroom, touched off a furor and demands for his resignation. But more broadly, his diatribe has helped raise this question: Can gay people find justice in the South?

While judicial prejudice appears everywhere, an overwhelming majority of cases infected with antigay bias come from Southern states, says Kate Kendell, executive director of the San Francisco-based National Center for Lesbian Rights.

"One of the very first questions we ask during an intake is where the person is calling from," Kendell says. "And when they say a Southern state, we know automatically that advocating on their behalf is going to be more difficult--solely because we will have a fair possibility of getting a judge who will be incapable of rendering an objective, open-minded ruling."

Just a few weeks after Moore issued his opinion, a Mississippi judge stole the spotlight from him. George County court judge Connie Glenn Wilkerson, in a letter to the local newspaper, wrote that he was sorry California had approved a law granting same-sex partners the right to sue for wrongful death. "In my opinion, gays and lesbians should be put in some type of a mental institution instead of having a law like this passed for them," he wrote.

New York City-based Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund filed ethics complaints against both Moore and Wilkerson. In its Alabama complaint, the group noted that Moore based his opinion on his own interpretation of the Bible and asserted, "Impartiality ... requires that a judge set aside personal biases and beliefs, religious or otherwise." Says Hector Vargas, director of Lambda's Southern regional office: "Rather than displaying a fair and open mind ... the judge blindly condemns gay people and explicitly refuses to rule based on the actual evidence in a case."

Lambda's complaint against Wilkerson was fried jointly with gay rights advocacy group Equality Mississippi. "How can anybody say [gays] should all be put in mental institutions and yet be able to judge them fairly?" Lambda attorney Greg Nevins asks. "That does not make sense." Even though Wilkerson's comments were made outside his judicial activities, Nevins says they call "into serious question" whether the judge could decide cases impartially. Vargas adds that Lambda is "extremely concerned about the rash of antigay statements from judges," saying, "These kinds of statements make gays and lesbians feel that the justice system is closed off to them."

One of the most egregious examples of judicial prejudice, Kendell says, occurred in Pensacola, Fla. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Southern Injustice: The Chief Justice of Alabama Calls Homosexuality "An Inherent Evil," and a Mississippi Judge Says Gay People Should Be Institutionalized. Can Equal Justice Be Found South of the Mason-Dixon Line? (Court)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.