Too Many Governors Absent from School

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), June 11, 2002 | Go to article overview

Too Many Governors Absent from School


Byline: RHODRI EVANS

There used to be a time when the great and the good were proud to be associated with their local school.

Councillors, aldermen and local business leaders were proud to become school governors, the prestige underlining their status as pillars of the community.

Yet today more than 1,500 posts for school governors remain unfilled across Wales.

It mirrors the situation in our community councils where many seats are filled without any need for elections because of the dearth of candidates.

Is the sense of public duty dead today? Becoming a school governor could appear to have little to commend it.

There is no money to be earned and yet valuable time must be dedicated to the role. Being a member of a school governing body is not like being a member of a cosy quango, where you go along a couple of days a month and draw a nice little slice of remuneration.

While unpaid, the responsibilities of every school governor are great.

Not least, there is the knowledge that the future of the children in the community is directly tied up in the success of their school.

School governors can also find themselves having to make difficult decisions.

A number of recent cases involving problems inside Welsh schools provide prime examples.

What would you do if your head teacher was, like Marjorie Evans, accused of assaulting a pupil?

Equally, what would you do if your head teacher was accused, like Cwmcarn High School head teacher Bill Beales, of making unacceptable remarks during a school assembly? …

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