Health Matters: Diabetes - Too Deadly to Ignore

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), June 12, 2002 | Go to article overview

Health Matters: Diabetes - Too Deadly to Ignore


Byline: RACHEL WILLIAMS

The facts about diabetes are stark. Around 1.4 million people in UK have the condition, a further million are thought to have it without realising and the number of cases is set to double by 2010.

If not treated properly it can lead to heart disease, kidney disease, stroke, blindness and nerve damage potentially resulting in amputation.

And recent research shows that people with diabetes are twice as likely to die prematurely than those without the condition.

Paul Streets, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK, says it's vital that people with diabetes are diagnosed and receive the appropriate treatment.

"It's a misconception that there is such a thing as `mild' diabetes. The complications can be horrendous."

Diabetes mellitus is a condition in which the amount of glucose - which is produced when sugar and starchy foods are digested - in the blood is too high because the body cannot turn it into energy as it should, using the hormone insulin.

There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1, or insulin-dependent, diabetes develops if the body is unable to produce any insulin. It usually appears before the age of 40, lasts for life, and is treated by insulin injections and diet.

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body's insulin is insufficient or does not work properly. It usually appears in over-40s and is treated by various combinations of diet, exercise, tablets and insulin injections.

People with a family history of diabetes, Asians or blacks, the obese and women who have had a baby weighing more than 8lb 8oz are most at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

"Our sedentary lifestyle is leading to an increasing prevalence of Type 2 diabetes," says Streets.

Most worrying, he says, is evidence from America of children developing the condition as a result of inactivity and eating too much junk food, and the likelihood that the same pattern will be seen here.

He emphasises though that for adults, although there are high risk groups, anyone can develop Type 2 diabetes, including top sportsmen like Olympic gold medallist rower Sir Steve Redgrave.

"The problem is that the symptoms of Type 2 diabetes can be misleading and are often just thought to be signs of getting old,"says Streets.

Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott has recently revealed he has the condition and broadcaster John Peel was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes after years of feeling run down and not knowing why.

"People need to be aware if they are in a high risk group, and know what the early symptoms are," Streets says.

These include increased thirst, going to the loo all the time (especially at night), extreme tiredness, weight loss, genital itching or regular episodes of thrush and blurred vision. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Health Matters: Diabetes - Too Deadly to Ignore
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.