FDA Continues Work to Help Prevent Mad Cow Disease

By Bren, Linda | FDA Consumer, May-June 2002 | Go to article overview

FDA Continues Work to Help Prevent Mad Cow Disease


Bren, Linda, FDA Consumer


The prevention of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly called mad cow disease, remains a top priority for the Food and Drug Administration and other government agencies.

BSE is a chronic, degenerative disorder affecting the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) of cattle. A similar disorder in people, called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), is believed to be caused by eating certain tissues from BSE-affected cattle. Both BSE and vCJD are fatal. Neither disease has ever been found in the United States.

A recent study by Harvard University gave high marks to government efforts to keep BSE out of the United States and to prevent its spread if it is ever found here.

The Harvard risk assessment study, released in November 2001, determined that the chances of BSE entering the United States and posing a risk to consumers and the agricultural industry are "extremely low." This three-year landmark study, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), concluded that the joint efforts of the USDA and the FDA have been largely responsible for keeping BSE out of the country. Further, in the unlikely event that BSE would appear in U.S. cattle herds, the government's "multiple firewall" system would keep the disease from spreading so that it would eventually die out, according to the study. This firewall consists of a feed ban, import controls, and a surveillance program.

The Harvard study identified the feed ban as the linchpin of protection against the spread of BSE. Established in 1997 by the FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM), the animal feed regulation prohibits feeding to cattle and other ruminants (such as sheep and goats) most mammalian protein, including a feed supplement known as meat-and-bone meal (MBM). Feeding cattle MBM that is contaminated with BSE is believed to be the most likely way for BSE to spread throughout a cattle herd.

Import controls are the critical safeguard against BSE being introduced into the United States. Since 1989, the USDA has banned the import of live ruminants and most ruminant products from the United Kingdom and other countries where BSE has been reported and from countries thought to be at high risk for BSE. The ban was expanded to include most of Europe in 1997 and Japan in 2001.

The third essential component of the firewall system of BSE prevention is the USDA's active surveillance program. The USDA has tested more than 21,000 cattle brains for BSE in the United States and Puerto Rico during the program's 11 years of operation and has found no evidence of BSE in American cattle.

"There are many places where one could intervene along the food chain to help prevent BSE," says Murray M. Lumpkin, M.D., the FDA's senior associate commissioner. "From the conception of the animal, through its raising and feeding, through the slaughtering and processing, to the marketplace, and to the preparation. Controlling all of these steps and the many people involved in them would be logistically impossible," says Lumpkin. But the Harvard study factored them all into their model to help determine which interventions have the greatest potential impact and what further actions the government could take to make the present very small risk of BSE in the United States even smaller. …

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