: Food & Drink: Taste Test: Dishy Fishy; Lew Baxter at Jenny's Seafood Restaurant, Liverpool AS the Evening Mellowed, the Gentle Burbling Chit-Chat Meandered into Surreal Territory Where We Recalled with Delight the Bizarre Antics of Archie Andrews, the Only Ventriloquist's Dummy to Be a Radio Star, and Then Surfaced into a Discussion about the Pals of Sooty and Sweep

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), June 15, 2002 | Go to article overview

: Food & Drink: Taste Test: Dishy Fishy; Lew Baxter at Jenny's Seafood Restaurant, Liverpool AS the Evening Mellowed, the Gentle Burbling Chit-Chat Meandered into Surreal Territory Where We Recalled with Delight the Bizarre Antics of Archie Andrews, the Only Ventriloquist's Dummy to Be a Radio Star, and Then Surfaced into a Discussion about the Pals of Sooty and Sweep


We were tucking enthusiastically into platefuls of aromatic flavour-filled fish dishes that for eons have marked out Jenny's as an institution among Liverpool's business glitterati and other more vacuous celebrities from sport and television.

Mouths bulging with delicious chewy monkfish and mussels sauted in a tarragon and saffron sauce and even a plain grilled plaice garnished with lemon chunks that apparently was meltingly mouth watering, we struggled with our memories.

We were marking one of our party's 78th birthday and fully expected that she would have the answer to this conundrum but the plaice was so tasty that she declined to break off from savouring every forkful, as that peculiar angst of a blank mind swithered between us.

Suddenly, as she was freshening up the glasses with a rather coquettish Chilean country wine, our waitress - a delightfully competent young lady who had been both surreptitious and yet attentive - murmured: ``Excuse me for interrupting but I think one was Soo.'' And we all cheered, ever so sotto voce of course as other diners were enjoying the friendly ambience.

Indeed, this is one of Jenny's remarkable attributes; it can on first glance appear a trifle formal, a touch of the elitist with its muted colours, soft music and, it has to be said, old fashioned elegance.

Strangers might just miss the entrance down a back alley quaintly called the Old Ropery amid the canyons of buildings off Fenwick Street, then down a steep wooden staircase into the bowels of the earth.

It still boasts a traditional maitre d' although the effusive, fresh-faced young man who greeted us in a formal dinner jacket and black bow tie managed to convey both the serious intent of the restaurant aligned with a light-hearted line in banter that remained very much within the realms of propriety and social grace.

Presenting our pre-dinner drinks, with a confidential, almost impish, wink he revealed that the lobsters were so fresh that he had just heard them scuttling into the kitchen; and that Chef was a deft hand at dealing with these creatures, ladies and gentlemen.

My own request for a still mineral water was met with another gurning twinkle as he apologetically explained that there was a sparkling Perrier but, unfortunately, water without the bubbles was courtesy of Eau de Mersey. This au naturale approach warmed our party of four to the venue and he remained as a shimmering presence throughout the evening, but never intrusive.

Just as we pondered the eclectic menu he also divulged, once again in a confidential aside, that although Jenny's was an award winning seafood restaurant there was one T-bone steak left. And, yes, Chef was also a dab hand with that. We smiled indulgently and perused the fishy dishes.

Perhaps as a test of Chef's consummate talents one of us asked if a ginger and honey sauce, earmarked for another dish, could enhance the steamed halibut. Without flinching the maitre d' assented and it later turned out to be quite a stunning combination. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

: Food & Drink: Taste Test: Dishy Fishy; Lew Baxter at Jenny's Seafood Restaurant, Liverpool AS the Evening Mellowed, the Gentle Burbling Chit-Chat Meandered into Surreal Territory Where We Recalled with Delight the Bizarre Antics of Archie Andrews, the Only Ventriloquist's Dummy to Be a Radio Star, and Then Surfaced into a Discussion about the Pals of Sooty and Sweep
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.