Politically Correct Cum Laude; Segregated Commencements Usurp Unity, optimism.(OPED)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

Politically Correct Cum Laude; Segregated Commencements Usurp Unity, optimism.(OPED)


Byline: Marc Levin, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

As the season of college graduations draws to a close, it is clear that, despite the massacres of September 11, many colleges are more determined than ever before to send graduates into the world with divisive and politicized ceremonies, eschewing the themes of optimism and unity traditionally associated with commencements.

Perhaps the most disturbing trend is the advent of separate ceremonies for minority groups. While the blood shed at the World Trade Center and Pentagon and in Pennsylvania was the same color for all who were murdered, many universities have decided that the best way to prepare their graduates for an increasingly diverse society is to hold segregated graduations.

In 2002, the University of California at Santa Cruz held a special ceremony for more than 45 gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender students. This event even included local high school and community college graduates, indoctrinating them into the separatist campus orthodoxy. At Iowa State University the "Lavender Graduation" was held to honor lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students. The University of Michigan also sponsors a separate homosexual graduation.

The University of California at Los Angeles attempts to cover all the bases, holding a Lavender Graduation for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students, a "Raza Graduation" for Latinos, as well as separate graduations for Filipinos, Asian Pacific Islanders, blacks, Iranians and American Indians.

Even when graduations do not themselves promote divisiveness through separate minority ceremonies, left-wing commencement speakers often create discord by making egregious remarks. Perhaps the most offensive commencement address in 2002 was delivered by Professor Bell Hooks, who rejects capitalization as an invalid social construct, at Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas.

Ms. Hooks stated, "The radical, dissident voices among you have learned here at Southwestern how to form communities of resistance that have helped you find your way in the midst of life-threatening conservatism, loneliness, and the powerful forces of everyday fascism which use the politics of exclusion and ostracism to maintain the status quo. Every terrorist regime in the world uses isolation to break people's spirits."

Ms. Hooks declared, "Indeed our nation's call for violence in the aftermath of September 11 was an expression of widespread hopelessness, the cynicism that has been at the heart of our nation's ongoing fascination with death. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Politically Correct Cum Laude; Segregated Commencements Usurp Unity, optimism.(OPED)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.