DuPage Prosecutor Presents View on Capital Punishment to Senate Panel

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 17, 2002 | Go to article overview

DuPage Prosecutor Presents View on Capital Punishment to Senate Panel


Byline: Christy Gutowski

One of DuPage County's top prosecutors just returned from Washington, D.C., where he spoke before a senate panel about Illinois' death penalty.

John Kinsella, first-assistant state's attorney, was asked to give a prosecutor's view of capital punishment since Gov. George Ryan's moratorium.

The 21-year prosecutor pointed out many in his field regard the moratorium as unconstitutional, because they argue the governor does not have authority to abolish a state law.

Prosecutors across the state still seek capital punishment, Kinsella told senators, and judges continue to impose the sentence. The punishment has been affirmed by higher courts.

The Illinois Supreme Court, however, has not issued any execution dates since the moratorium because the attorney general, out of respect for the governor, has not sought such an order.

"The only actual consequence to date has been that many capital cases have been procedurally put on hold for three years, still leaving the remaining issues in those cases unresolved," Kinsella said.

The senate panel, chaired by Sen. Russell Feingold of Wisconsin, was convened June 12 to highlight the steps taken in Illinois to fix its system of capital punishment after 13 innocent men were exonerated from death row.

Kinsella, who has tried more than 100 felony cases, including capital murders, said prosecutors as a group support a majority of the recommendations made by the governor's commission examining the state's death penalty system.

Still, several of the proposals will not enhance the ability of police or prosecutors to investigate or try a case, he said. In fact, some prosecutors argue the changes are so restrictive that, if enacted, the death penalty will be impossible to impose.

The governor's commission voted to abolish the death penalty in Illinois.

Kinsella also told federal lawmakers about the reforms that have been enacted into law since the moratorium. Prosecutors had a hand in crafting many of the changes. They include new training standards, the creation of a trust fund to finance the defense of indigent defendants and expanded DNA testing, among others.

"The new rules are designed to afford greater protections to the accused and to assure a far greater degree of confidence in the judgements of the court," Kinsella said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

DuPage Prosecutor Presents View on Capital Punishment to Senate Panel
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.