Science Camps for Kids Makes Learning Fun

By Bystryk, Barbara | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

Science Camps for Kids Makes Learning Fun


Bystryk, Barbara, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Barbara stryk Daily Herald Staff Writer

It was a perfect day for a rocket launch.

The second- through fifth-graders who gathered Tuesday at Naperville's Lincoln Junior High all cheered as the model rocket lifted off with a bang, soared into the blue sky and then floated to the ground with the aid of a parachute.

Amid all the cheering, it was possible some of the youngsters didn't realize they were learning about the laws of energy and maybe developing just a little greater interest in science.

The students are part of the week-long "Mars Mission" and "On the Frontiers of Science: Experiments that Ooze, Bubble, Drip or Bounce" camps at the school.

Lincoln offers 10 different hands-on Summer Science and Technology Camps for children who just completed kindergarten through eighth grade.

The kids have chances to make connections among math, science and technology and see how they apply in the real world, said Craig Weber, director of the camps, Learning Center director at Beebe Elementary School and mayor of Oswego.

Participants go over life, earth and physical sciences, apply the principles of science and the scientific method, and have a lot of fun doing it, Weber said.

"We focus on trying to get kids excited about science," he said.

Katie Maroney, a teacher of the "On the Frontiers of Science," camp, which is designed for boys and girls who recently completed second grade, said her camp covers a different science every day.

The camps are a sound way for students to channel their energy, enthusiasm and natural curiosity toward science so they have a positive feeling about it as they get older, she said. …

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