Hate Crimes; Local Law Enforcement Bill Gives Homosexuals Special status.(OPED)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 21, 2002 | Go to article overview

Hate Crimes; Local Law Enforcement Bill Gives Homosexuals Special status.(OPED)


Byline: Robert H. Knight, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle tried last week to quash debate on Sen. Ted Kennedy's proposed federal "hate crimes" bill. The gambit perfectly illustrated what these men are trying to do to the whole country - shut down discussion about homosexuality.

The brilliantly misnamed Local Law Enforcement Enhancement Act would vastly increase federal police power - not that of the local cops. The feds could rush in anywhere they decided something is a "hate crime."

And what exactly constitutes a hate crime?

Gary Glenn, president of the American Family Association of Michigan, gives this summary: "A criminal who physically assaults a pregnant mom, a small child, or a senior citizen will be punished less severely than someone who attacks a grown man, if that grown man engages in homosexual behavior."

No wonder Messrs. Daschle and Kennedy wanted to close the curtain and instruct the nation to "pay no attention" to the giant red-faced man pulling all the levers. Even a cursory look reveals stark absurdities.

Do you think rape is a hate crime? Well, gird your loins for this one: At a Senate committee hearing, Mr. Kennedy said that most rapes are not hate crimes, only the ones motivated by "gender bias." That must be comforting to women whose attacker has been a politically correct rapist.

The Local Law Enforcement Act is being sold as a crime-fighting tool and civil rights measure, but it is really an old-fashioned federal power grab. Chief Justice William Rehnquist has warned of a trend toward federalizing crime and the growing specter of a national police force. The Kennedy measure would put it all on a fast track.

The bill is above all a sop to an increasingly pampered special-interest group: homosexual activists. …

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