Football World Cup 2002: SLOW TORTURE FOR ENGLAND; ENGLAND'S WORLD CUP IN JAPAN 2002: THEY HAVE DONE US PROUD ENGLAND 1 BRAZIL 2; Dream Dies as Cool Brazil Outwit Sven's Boys

The Mirror (London, England), June 22, 2002 | Go to article overview

Football World Cup 2002: SLOW TORTURE FOR ENGLAND; ENGLAND'S WORLD CUP IN JAPAN 2002: THEY HAVE DONE US PROUD ENGLAND 1 BRAZIL 2; Dream Dies as Cool Brazil Outwit Sven's Boys


Byline: Martin Lipton

WHEN IT really counted, they weren't quite good enough. They just didn't have the guile or the self-belief required.

Even after David Seaman made the blunder that will haunt him for years, losing his bearings as Ronaldinho's free-kick floated into the net, England still had 40 minutes to salvage their dream.

For 32 of them, they only had 10 men to beat as Ronaldinho saw red for his tackle on Danny Mills.

It was at that stage that England should have thought about the football that had made victory possible, the opening period in which they made just one mistake, punished brutally by Rivaldo.

Yet at the very point that Sven Goran Eriksson wanted his players to show their intelligence, they could not summon the patience or calmness the Swede had preached.

Brazil, the team that supposedly could not defend, did show the necessary composure and snuffed out the game with disdainful ease. It was a slow, painful death, as England lacked the know-how to break the Brazilians down.

Darker

In the end, as Seaman shed his tears and the England fans stood as one to show their appreciation, that was the crucial difference, the reason Eriksson's team will be flying home today.

This is not a great Brazil team, even if it contains great individuals - practised in some of the darker arts as well as the "beautiful game".

But what they had, and England did not, was the streetwise instincts that Eriksson wants to instill in his side.

Eriksson admitted: "It was a missed opportunity. Up to their first goal we played more or less as we wanted to play but we couldn't take advantage of being a man up.

"I think we were tired. We started to chase the second goal and lost our patience and started to knock balls straight up to their three centre- backs. We wanted to play the ball round them, but instead played two or three passes and then went for the long ball up front. When you are tired in the legs you are tired in the brain as well.

"If you look at the games, in the second half against Sweden and for 35 minutes against Brazil we weren't clever enough or good enough."

And that is why they are out of a World Cup they could have won. Yet for 47 minutes, the promised land was within reach, the golden goblet stretched out for Eriksson's team to grasp, even as the temperatures soared into the 90s.

The defensive discipline Eriksson demanded was there. Rio Ferdinand and Sol Campbell stood up to everything Ronaldo and drama queen Rivaldo could hurl at them.

Nicky Butt and Paul Scholes held the midfield, not allowing the Brazilians time or space, while Emile Heskey put in the display of his life.

And they had the man Brazil feared, even if Michael Owen was nowhere near fit.

Where normally Brazilian defenders want to spend as much time in the opposition box as their own, in Shizuoka it was a different story.

Owen's pace meant Lucio, Roque Junior and Edmilson were terrified of letting him go. The reason why came in the 23rd minute, as the purposeful Mills, venturing forward, played short to Heskey.

For once, Brazil had left Owen one on one, and when Lucio allowed Heskey's probing ball to bounce off his thigh, there was only going to be one outcome. Owen's first touch placed the ball into his stride, his second put it into the back of the net.

Joy unconfined, in Sheffield as much as Shizuoka. His groin may have slowed him down, but Owen had lived up to Eriksson's prediction that this was his stage.

With Heskey wanting the ball, holding it up and causing problems, Trevor Sinclair linking with Ashley Cole on the left, and England looking controlled and focused, the dream was on.

Only once, when Ronaldo tricked his way past Cole only to be foiled by Seaman's feet, had England looked threatened. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Football World Cup 2002: SLOW TORTURE FOR ENGLAND; ENGLAND'S WORLD CUP IN JAPAN 2002: THEY HAVE DONE US PROUD ENGLAND 1 BRAZIL 2; Dream Dies as Cool Brazil Outwit Sven's Boys
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.