Extra Credits; High Schoolers Spend Summer at college.(LIFE - SCHOOLS)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 24, 2002 | Go to article overview

Extra Credits; High Schoolers Spend Summer at college.(LIFE - SCHOOLS)


Byline: Lisa Rauschart, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

An increasing number of high school students will be spending their time this summer not at the beach or the ballpark, but back in class. More and more area colleges and universities are offering programs

targeted especially for high school students.

Need some coaching in writing your college-application essays? American University has a workshop for you. Want to explore the growing field of kinesiology? The University of Maryland's Young Scholars Program not only will give you hands-on time in the classroom, but will take you outside the campus to explore Washington and Baltimore. If you are considering a major in international relations, Georgetown's intensive eight-day program in the subject offers lectures, small group discussions, visits to organizations involved in foreign policy and a simulation of an international crisis.

What makes these and other programs offered by area schools noteworthy is not only their number, but their scope. Each institution offers many summer programs for high school students, from college-preparatory programs to courses designed for specific interests such as medicine, law, and film and video production.

Some are intense eight- or 10-day experiences; others last five weeks. Many earn students college credit. Colleges promise that just about any course they offer will look very good on a college application.

"Such credits show how serious a student actually is," says Mike Sims, executive director of the National Student Leadership Conference, which offers programs in collaboration with George Mason University, the University of Maryland and AU.

Many area high school students already have had a taste of college life. Programs that operate during the school year routinely take students out of the high school classroom and into the university. In the District, the Consortium of Colleges and Universities allows D.C. public school students, as well as students from Archbishop Carroll High School, to take introductory classes as part of the High School College Internship Program.

In Montgomery County, qualified high school students can take courses offered by Montgomery College. Similar programs exist in other nearby school districts.

"It's a good way to maintain interest in learning, especially for seniors, who may be suffering from that senior-year slump," says Dale Fulton, director of curriculum for Montgomery County Public Schools.

For many educators, summer programs offered by area colleges for high school students are just another way of continuing to spark interest and excitement about learning.

"As students, they are moving on a continuum," Mr. Fulton says. "We don't want them just doing nothing. Such opportunities can excite a kid, who can come back to school recharged."

Of course, college summer programs also can work as useful recruiting tools.

Many attract college-bound students from out of the area, but they also draw a fair number of local students attracted by the programs and institutional expertise. Of the 160 students enrolled at Georgetown University's international relations program, for example, 15 are from the District and its surrounding suburbs.

Because many programs require campus residence, dorms are filled at a time when they typically would be empty. Many of the programs have curfews and don't permit alcohol on campus, but parents still must determine whether their teens are mature enough to handle living away from home.

For students, summer programs at area colleges offer an opportunity to get a leg up on college in a number of ways. Many are looking for an admissions edge and hope time spent in a college or university's summer program will give them an advantage when it comes to admission.

"There are no guarantees," says Emily Harrington, director of the School for Summer and Continuing Education at Georgetown University. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Extra Credits; High Schoolers Spend Summer at college.(LIFE - SCHOOLS)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.