Theodore Roosevelt Set a High Standard in Oval Office

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 23, 2002 | Go to article overview

Theodore Roosevelt Set a High Standard in Oval Office


Byline: Diana Dretske

With the assassination of President William McKinley in 1901, Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) became the youngest president in the nation's history. He is considered to be the first truly modern president in both domestic and foreign policy.

Born in New York City, Roosevelt suffered from asthma as a child, but as a teenager taught himself to ride and box, developing a rugged physique. During the Spanish-American War, Roosevelt volunteered as commander of the 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry, known as the Rough Riders. His daring charge on San Juan Hill, Cuba, made him a war hero and helped him to be elected governor of New York.

In 1900, Roosevelt ran as William McKinley's vice president, and in 1901, when McKinley was assassinated became president. One critic bemoaned "that damned cowboy" is now president. Roosevelt was reelected in 1904, and looked on himself as the "steward of the people."

As president, Roosevelt's "Square Deal" domestic program initiated welfare legislation, encouraged the growth of labor unions and enforced government regulation of industry. His bold stance on business prompted one newspaper of the day to note that, "Wall Street is paralyzed at the thought that a president ... would sink so low as to try to enforce the law."

Roosevelt was significant in getting the Panama Canal built to stimulate American commerce and the Nation's new position in the world. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Theodore Roosevelt Set a High Standard in Oval Office
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.