Roots as Fuel


Massive deforestation of the Third World clearly has a devastating effect on the global environment. But Eugene B. Shultz and Wayne G. Bragg of Washington University in St. Louis think that followers of the phenomenon may be "missing the trees for the forests."

The immediate impact of deforestation is felt by the nearly 60% of the Third World's population that still cooks food on a three-stone fireplace or a similar device. Many spend the equivalent of one day a week roaming the countryside in pursuit of an ever dwindling supply of one of their most basic necessities: cooking fuel. But scientists have discovered that the roots of a common gourd make a useful cooking fuel that could be used in countries suffering the effects of deforestation.

"We have discovered that the roots of various common squashes and gourds, when dried in the sun over a period of several days, make a very acceptable cooking fuel for people in the Third World," says Shultz, a professor of engineering and applied science. "The development of plants for fuel rootfuel, we call it - and other novel biological resources could revitalize what have become decimated rural areas in the Third World and could give reforested areas the decades they need for regrowth."

The scientists are urging people in the arid, deforested areas where the rootfuel crops grow wild to use the readily available resource, sparing dwindling forests. Eventually, the roots might be cultivated on poor or marginal sod where the plants would not compete with food crops.

Shultz and Bragg, who conducted "taste tests" of rootfuel-cooked food in Mexico, Senegal, and Niger, were concerned that undesirable flavors would be passed on to food from open-fire cooking, but aU participants found rootfuel a good option. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Roots as Fuel
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.