Stay Younger Longer

By Courteney, Hazel | Daily Mail (London), July 2, 2002 | Go to article overview

Stay Younger Longer


Courteney, Hazel, Daily Mail (London)


Byline: HAZEL COURTENEY

WITH HAZEL COURTENEY FIFTEEN per cent of the UK population is 65 or over. By 2020 this will increase to more than 20 pc, and one in four of them will be 80 or over.

So it is hardly surprising that anti-ageing medicine has become the fastest growth sector in healthcare. Scientists say most of us could live healthy, more productive lives if we begin implementing proven anti-ageing strategies. To help you stay younger longer, we welcome back award-winning alternative health columnist Hazel Courteney, who every fortnight will advise you on how to stay younger for longer.

HOW do honey, brown rice syrup, parsley, watercress, papaya and canteloupe melons help to slow the ageing process? By realkalizing the body. Allow me to explain.

Everything we swallow, once metabolised, breaks down into either an alkaline or acid mineral residue. For good health, the body needs to be around 70pc alkaline and 30pc acid. To function properly, every cell needs to be predominantly alkaline.

Unfortunately, in the West, our fast-paced lifestyle and dietary habits mean the average person is 80pc acid and 20pc alkaline.

'And in the long term,' says naturopath Stephen Langley, 'an over-acid system can trigger practically every major degenerative disease, including certain cancers.

This is why maintaining the body's acid-alkaline balance is one of the most crucial keys to antiageing.' Our blood needs to be slightly alkaline, but if it becomes too acid it begins withdrawing alkalizing minerals such as potassium, calcium and magnesium, first from the hair and nails, which become dull and dry, then from the skin and eventually from the bones.

In an acid environment, production of free radicals increases and healthy bacteria in the gut die, thus weakening the immune system.

Typical symptoms of overacid tissues include aching joints and muscles, arthritis, yeast and fungal conditions such as candida, nervousness, lethargy and mental 'fog'. Sound familiar?

Apparently, the majority of our foods are acidforming, but this does not necessarily make them unhealthy. For instance, protein foods are essential, but if you eat too much animal protein, especially red meats, full fat creams and cheeses, then an over-acid system will result. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Stay Younger Longer
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.