Democracy on Trial

By Raza, Moosi | Economic Review, January 1990 | Go to article overview

Democracy on Trial


Raza, Moosi, Economic Review


Clouds of uncertainty are looming large over the country. Constitutional controversy, centre-province confrontation and law and order situation are assuming new dimensions. Sensational issues are tried to be settled on streets. These issues were haunting the mind of a peace loving citizen. It was 10 p.m. when Begum Ashraf Abbasi Saheba was contacted on telephone for knowing her views on various national issues. Next morning when we were at her residence, we were informed that she was busy in reciting Holy Quran upstairs. Few minutes later an elderly woman in simple oriental Kurta-Shalwar and Dupatta over her head entered the room in dignified manner. She was having rosary (Tasbih) in her hand, where some more people were waiting. After a brief introduction we were taken to the adjacent room possibly the drawing room, the complexion of which displays the outlook of a house occupied by a middle class family. It was only the security measure outside the residence which disclosed the fact that it was owned by the Deputy Speaker. It might be due to her son Mr. Munawar All Abbasi, Minister for Local Bodies, Sindh, who is also putting up there.

Begum Ashraf Abbasi, Deputy Speaker, National Assembly is a medical Doctor by profession. Her academic career was excellent. Actively participated in the student union activities and elected as Clinical Secretary. Entered in active political mainstream in 1961, Clinical Secretary. Entered in active political mainstream in 1961, she remained close comrade of Shaheed Zulfikar Ali Bhutto and elected as member West Pakistan Assembly in 1962 and 1965. In 1971 she was elected as MNA and served as Deputy Speaker, NA from 1973-77. In March 1977 as MPA Sindh she held the Ministership of Local bodies till July 5, 1977 the day Martial Law took over the reins. Doctor Saheba bravely challenged the tyranny. Imprisonments and atrocities within and outside jail could neither cow-down her valiant struggle nor could arrest her thinking, ambitions and principles. She is a crusader of human rights, democracy and an outstanding social worker. Economic Review interviewed her on various vital issues confronting the nation. Following are the excerpts:

Economic Review. National Assembly is the most dignified forum. The level of discussion is generally considered to be low there. What is the reason and what measures do you suggest for its improvement?

Dr. Ashraf Abbasi. I agree with you that it is the highest forum in the country. I do not think that the level of discussion is below the standard. Sometimes there are out-bursts on certain points. But one should see it in the right perspective. There was no democracy earlier in the country. If the democracy had continued people would have learnt its norms. Politics is a science and one should learn it as a science. Experience comes through established system. The subject could be understood only when there is continuity in democracy. There was no National Assembly so we cannot expect same sort of discussion as there would have been it there had been democracy. As a legislator one has to learn a lot and tolerate a lot which is possible in continuity of democratic systems. In the past, political system have been neglected. Military, civil bureaucracy and judicial institutions had continuity but the political parties were not allowed to function. We the politicians have been thrown out in one or the other way. Sometimes in jails, sometimes here and sometimes there. There is no importance of legislators in the martial law. There should be continuity in the process of democracy in order to establish the systems. We have very talented people. Inshallan by an by we will learn to tolerate each other. Tolerance and discussion through reasoning is the only way of legislation. In democracy you have to give your ear to reason no matter from where it comes.

ER. What are the handicaps in the way of legislation in the National Assembly. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Democracy on Trial
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.