DONATIONS RISE; Charities' Post-Attack Fears Fail to materialize.(PAGE ONE)(SPECIAL REPORT)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 7, 2002 | Go to article overview

DONATIONS RISE; Charities' Post-Attack Fears Fail to materialize.(PAGE ONE)(SPECIAL REPORT)


Byline: Joyce Howard Price, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Salvation Army and the American Heart Association, two of the nation's largest charities, both concede they had some nervous moments in the aftermath of September 11 and the recession as a result of decreased donations in some parts of the country. But the fears did not materialize on a national basis. The Salvation Army and the heart association - which rank first and 15th, respectively, in the nation in total donations, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy - both ended up taking in more contributions either in the calendar year 2001 or fiscal 2002 than they did the previous year. However, in neither case was the level of increase what the charities had been used to in the past.

It's a situation many charities have experienced, and most blame the economy, not the September 11 terrorist attacks, for their less robust fiscal situations. Food banks and soup kitchens say they have seen sharply increased demand in some regions that lost badly needed tourism dollars after the September 11 attacks.

And St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., which ranks 30th in total contributions, says its budget is down between $12 million and $15 million, a drop of 5 percent from a year ago. One factor in the decline, says Richard Shadyac, chief executive officer and national executive director of the American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities (ALSAC)/St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, was the donations that schoolchildren and others made to victims of September 11, rather than to St. Jude.

In particular, St. Jude's was hurt by the negative media publicity surrounding the use of September 11 funds by charities such as the American Red Cross and the United Way.

"The main issue we were confronting was the lack of accountability by some charities the lack of accountability to donors for the use of their money by the Red Cross and the United Way has greatly affected all charities," said Mr. Shadyac, who says he's confirmed that fact with executives of other charitable groups.

Lt. Col. Tom Jones, national community relations and development secretary for the Salvation Army, didn't identify any charities he believes were at fault. "But I do believe some Americans became skeptical when they read stories about charities not handling money appropriately," he said.

Charities under fire

The American Red Cross was sharply criticized when it indicated it would hold back some money contributed for victims of September 11 and apply it elsewhere. Last month, the national Red Cross fired the entire board of its San Diego chapter because of concerns about its decreased fund raising and public credibility. Questions were asked about how the chapter spent money raised for victims of a wildfire that occurred in January 2001 and its unwillingness to turn over documents sought by a panel assigned to investigate the chapter.

Sen. Charles E. Grassley of Iowa, ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, has leveled many complaints at the chapter and has wondered why a former chapter CEO earned an annual salary of more than $300,000. National Red Cross leaders wanted the CEO, Dodie Rotherham, fired, but the chapter board resisted.

In recent months, the United Way of the National Capital Area has raised eyebrows and generated news reports about its accounting practices and the way it treats contributions. According to reports in The Washington Post, the chapter acknowledged it reported about $2.6 million in donations last year that it never received or distributed; it released figures showing it deducts as much as 45 percent of contributions from donors who do not specify a charity in order to pay overhead costs.

Also, it was disclosed that the local United Way chapter had withheld more than $1 million collected in recent years on behalf of charities and had placed that money into its reserves, The Post said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

DONATIONS RISE; Charities' Post-Attack Fears Fail to materialize.(PAGE ONE)(SPECIAL REPORT)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.