Stars Join Battle against Factory Farming Methods; Video Campaign to Mark Launch of National Vegetarian Week

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), July 9, 2002 | Go to article overview

Stars Join Battle against Factory Farming Methods; Video Campaign to Mark Launch of National Vegetarian Week


STARS such as Sir Paul McCartney, Joanna Lumley and Martin Shaw appear in a new video to mark National Vegetarian Week, launched yesterday.

The short film has been produced by Viva!, which is campaigning against factory farm practices.

The issue will be highlighted in a national march and rally in central London on Saturday.

Those attending will be shown the film, in which Sir Paul says: 'There are a whole lot of things wrong with our planet at the moment.

'We hear a lot of words from big business and from Government but they don't seem to do much about it. But we can do something about it.

'We can help the environment, we can help end cruelty to animals and we can help improve our own health, and all you have to do is go vegetarian.'

Viva! say 45 billion animals were slaughtered in the world last year, one billion in Britain, and most of them were factory farmed.

Actress Joanna Lumley, a strong supporter of the group, says: 'We've got to realise that we're creatures of this planet, treat living things with respect and the earth will show respect back.'

Actor Martin Shaw says: 'If people, before they eat their meals, were taken to a factory farm and saw the degradation and torture they are party to, I don't think most would want to carry on.'

Others who appear in the film are singer Chrissie Hynde, prominent barrister and Viva! patron Michael Mansfield, QC, actor Jerome Flynn, and TV presenter Wendy Turner-Webster.

Vegetarianism - factfilea

n Vegetarians do not eat meat, fish, or poultry. Vegans are vegetarians who abstain from eating or using all animal products, including milk, cheese, other dairy items, eggs, wool, silk, and leather.

n Among the many reasons for being a vegetarian are health, ecological, and religious concerns, dislike of meat, compassion for animals, belief in non-violence, and economics.

n Vegetarianism was advocated by the ancient Greeks. Pythagoras and his followers believed that animals should not be killed and eaten because they have souls. Plato believed plant foods promoted good health, while other Greek thinkers felt that eating animal flesh was naturally repugnant and should be rejected on aesthetic grounds.

n In later times, famous writers such as, Voltaire, Paley, Pope, Shelley, Bentham and Lamartine all expressed similar opinions about the desirability of a flesh-free diet. …

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