UCLA Study Examines Minority Representation in Network Television. (Noteworthy News)

Black Issues in Higher Education, July 4, 2002 | Go to article overview

UCLA Study Examines Minority Representation in Network Television. (Noteworthy News)


LOS ANGELES

Despite calls for more diversity on prime-time network television, African Americans continue to be overrepresented and concentrated in situation comedies while other ethnic groups remained underrepresented, according to a new UCLA study.

African Americans and Anglo Americans represented 92 percent of all prime-time characters in the study, yet they comprise 82 percent of the nation's population. In contrast, Latinos were the most underrepresented group in prime-time television. They accounted for 2 percent of all characters, although their national population is 12.5 percent. Asian Americans comprised about 3 percent of all characters, and American Indians were invisible.

"Much of the promise of Change on behalf of the networks has been lip service to appease people," says Dr. Darnell Hunt, the study's author and director of the UCLA Center for African American Studies. "There's been all this anticipation of change and there has been very little. Most of the networks have thrown out a few symbolic gestures and left most of the programming practices intact."

The research, titled "Prime Time in Black and White: Making Sense of the 2001 Fall Season," was based on a content analysis of 224 episodes of 85 fictional series that aired on ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, UPN and the WB in October and November 2001. It is the inaugural report of a five-year study that will track the on-screen presence of Black Americans in prime-time network television and issues pertaining to behind-the-scenes control. Hunt also was the author of a Screen Actors Guild study in 2000 with similar findings. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

UCLA Study Examines Minority Representation in Network Television. (Noteworthy News)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.