French Huguenots Noted. (Letters to the Editor)

The New American, July 15, 2002 | Go to article overview

French Huguenots Noted. (Letters to the Editor)


Thank you for Mr. William Norman Grigg's article on the history of Vendeans and their pursuit of freedom in France ("The Valiant Vendeans," June 17th). The mercy of Artus, the Marquis of Bonchamps, stands as a wonderful example of virtue in an otherwise terrible age.

There is a glaring omission in this retelling of French history, however. The suffering of the Roman Catholic Church during the Reign of Terror does not begin to compare to the suffering which it imposed on French Huguenots (Protestants) during the preceding 250 years. The article fails to recount the atrocities which Roman Catholics committed on Huguenot men, women and children during the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre of 1572, which are not unlike those committed by Jacobin radicals who turned on the Roman Church of their day. It is a mistake to look at the Roman Catholic Vendeans as true champions of liberty and freedom given the history of their barbarities towards French Huguenots. They represent the counter-Reformation movement in Europe's religious history. It is the French Huguenots who should be rightly credited as pioneers of ecclesiastical and civil liberty around the world, not their oppressors. The theology of John Calvin, and Philippe du Plessis-Mornay, the Huguenot author of "A Defense of Liber ty Against Tyrants" (1579), was a direct source of inspiration to freedom fighters everywhere, from Holland to England to colonial America. The Reign of Terror can be directly attributed to the massive, forced Diaspora of French Huguenots before and after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685), who were persecuted by the Roman Catholic monarchy, which then reaped the whirlwind after purging France of her Christian populace. France is still recovering from the spiritual void brought about by the counter-Reformation. These facts, not referenced in the article, cast the Vendean struggle in a different light, but it is the light of truth, which must be told. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

French Huguenots Noted. (Letters to the Editor)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.