Conservation across the Continent

National Wildlife, April-May 2002 | Go to article overview

Conservation across the Continent


Today common experience breaks the confines of national borders more than ever before. From pop culture to the Internet, we share one global community. This applies especially to our environment. There are no borders for the air we breathe, the water that sustains us or the wildlife that graces our world. We are reminded of this reality by the dependence of people and wildlife on the fragile health of waterways that span political boundaries, and by the spectacular journeys of migratory birds.

When we view wildlife and wild places as part of a single global landscape, we recognize anew that conserving our environment must not be limited by borders either. We are one community, bound by the natural resources on which we all depend.

Though we have carved North America into three nations, the continent remains one continuous habitat. Its vast land and wildlife will not flourish, or even endure, unless conservation efforts transcend artificial boundaries.

In the months to come, the reality of this interconnectedness will play out in the coverage of more international stories in National Wildlife. We have made the decision to broaden our own artificial boundaries by sharing with you more of our important international conservation work and the stories of the wildlife and wild places at stake.

The change parallels a new NWF initiative to build on years of work with Canadian conservationists and to reach out as well to our colleagues to the south. Mexico holds some of the most important biological resources of the continent and, indeed, the world. The nation sustains more mammal and bird species than the United States, in just one-fifth of the land area. Following requests from a range of Mexican environmental organizations, NWF is exploring ways we can help them build on their existing work to conserve Mexico's wildlife, habitat and natural resources. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Conservation across the Continent
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.