Understanding Long-Term Effects of Sports Sponsorship: Role of Experience, Involvement, Enthusiasm and Clutter. (Research Paper)

By Cornwell, T. Bettina; Relyea, George E. et al. | International Journal of Sports Marketing & Sponsorship, June-July 2000 | Go to article overview

Understanding Long-Term Effects of Sports Sponsorship: Role of Experience, Involvement, Enthusiasm and Clutter. (Research Paper)


Cornwell, T. Bettina, Relyea, George E., Irwin, Richard L., Maignan, Isabelle, International Journal of Sports Marketing & Sponsorship


Abstract: An empirical investigation based on 222 sports fans of a university basketball team finds that sports enthusiasm and the mere exposure to sponsorship stimuli is positively associated with the awareness of event sponsors. In addition, the findings reveal the negative impact of advertising and sponsorship clutter on individuals' recall and recognition of sponsors.

Keywords: Sports, Promotion, Advertising communications, Sponsorship-linked marketing

Executive Summary

This paper presents the development and examination of a theoretical model useful in understanding the various influences that shape an individual's recall and recognition of sponsors of an event. The model suggests that an individual's involvement with a particular sport, their enthusiasm for sports in general and their overall exposure to the sport all have a direct, positive influence on recall and recognition of sponsors supporting the event. The model also suggest that environmental clutter, in the form of promotional communications during the event, will negatively impact the individual's recall and recognition of event sponsors.

Findings from an empirical investigation of the model, based on 222 sports fans of a North American university basketball team, indicate that while involvement with a particular sport does not directly influence recall and recognition, it does have a positive influence on game attendance and resulting exposure to sponsor's messages. Enthusiasm for sports was found to influence both particular involvement and experience as well as to directly influence recall and recognition. Clutter, as expected, had a negative influence on both recall and recognition of sponsors.

While the measurement of most variables was good, the exception was the scale measuring promotional clutter. Although the measurement is in need of improvement it is important to marketers that a negative influence was found. This indicates that it is worthwhile for marketers to attempt to develop new measures of clutter and to include an assessment of the level of clutter expected at a venue and on broadcast events as important in evaluation of sponsorship proposals. However, until an adequate measure is developed no standardized assessment can be made and compared.

The findings regarding the indirect influence of involvement and enthusiasm on attending games, watching games on television and listening to games on the radio suggest that the marketer should seek sponsorship opportunities that increase both involvement with their particular sport and general enthusiasm for sports in the community. This may be accomplished through pre-game activities and communications thematically tied to increasing involvement and enthusiasm.

Understanding Long-Term Effects of Sports Sponsorship

Over the past few years, the sponsorships of sports, events, and causes has increasingly attracted the attention of marketers as both a promotion and a communication tool. Worldwide, sports sponsorships are the most popular and represent three-quarters of all sponsorship activity (Marshall and Cook, 1992; Smith, 1998). Despite this rapid growth, little is known about the effectiveness of sports sponsorship. Historically, corporate sponsors have not been inclined to evaluate the impact of their investments in events or celebrities (Hulks, 1980; McDonald, 1991). This situation is changing and there is a greater interest amongst marketers to quantify their investment in sponsorship. The few scholarly evaluations of sponsorship have yielded ambiguous results regarding the effectiveness of sponsorship: some authors record positive image effects, comparable to that of advertising (Rajaretnam, 1994; Turco, 1995), while other researchers report that sponsorship has little or no effect in terms of recall and company i mage (Javalgi et at., 1994; Otker and Hayes, 1987).

In light of the scarcity of past research and of its conflicting findings, the present empirical investigation examines some of the factors which may explain the differences observed in sports sponsorship recall and recognition. …

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