WE'VE NO SECRETS; Your Partner Really Does Know Exactly What You're thinking.(News)

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), August 4, 2002 | Go to article overview

WE'VE NO SECRETS; Your Partner Really Does Know Exactly What You're thinking.(News)


Byline: NICOLA PAY EXCLUSIVE

IT'S what you've always feared... your partner really can read your mind.

And it looks like no one has any secrets, especially from those closest to them.

So the next time hubby smiles through gritted teeth at the dinner table, his wife might already know he fancies nipping out for a fish supper.

Edinburgh University experts claim to have the first scientific proof of telepathy between "emotionally close" couples.

Dr Paul Stevens, of the parapsychology unit, said: "Our research isn't complete, but we may have found a significant pattern which we hope will demonstrate psychic ability."

Although the experiments are still going on, Dr Stevens will present his team's findings at an international convention in France this week.

The research involves splitting couples - lovers, friends, or relatives - into "senders" and "receivers".

Senders watch video clips selected at random from a library of 100 and are instructed to transmit telepathically what they see to their receiver, who sits in a sound- proofed room 25 metres away.

Using "white noise" tapes to lull subjects into an ultra-receptive state, both are wired up to allow any physiological changes in the body to be measured. …

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WE'VE NO SECRETS; Your Partner Really Does Know Exactly What You're thinking.(News)
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