British Common Law under Attack. (Insider Report)

The New American, August 12, 2002 | Go to article overview

British Common Law under Attack. (Insider Report)


The recent upsurge in violent crime suffered by citizens of Great Britain illustrates that suppressing the right to armed self-defense gives criminals a competitive advantage over the law-abiding population. But just as importantly, it illustrates how denying the right to keep and bear arms acts as a precursor to abolition of other key protections of individual liberty. As the July 19th Sydney Morning Herald reported, "An explosion in violent crime ... has put the ruling [socialist] Labour Party under pressure to take tough measures to get criminals off the streets." The proposed measures invade, or nullify outright, rights and guarantees cherished for centuries under British common law.

On July 17th, British Home Secretary David Blunkett, whose office roughly corresponds to that of U.S. attorney general, "unveiled a complete overhaul of the criminal justice system ... dramatically shifting the balance in court away from defendants in favor of prosecutors and victims," reported the July 19th London Independent. Blunkett's White Paper, entitled "Justice For All," proposes to abolish "the 800-year-old laws governing 'double jeopardy' for serious offenses that prevent a person from being tried twice. …

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