The Parting of the Red Sea.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)

Manila Bulletin, August 17, 2002 | Go to article overview

The Parting of the Red Sea.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)


TODAY, many people say that the parting of the Red Sea during the biblical time is a myth. It never happened, so they say. It is only a fantasy a legend a makebelieve story to humor and entertain people. There are others, however who believe that the parting of the Red Sea is a wondrous act of an omnipotent God. An amazing feat. A direct miracle performed by our Almighty God.

***

Let me refresh your minds by quoting some biblical verses about the parting of the Red Sea:

"The Lord said to Moses: 'Tell the Israelites to move on. Raise your staff and stretch out your hand over the sea to divide the water so that the Israelites can go through the sea on dry ground.'

"Then the angel of God, who had been traveling in front of Israel's army, withdrew and went behind them. The pillar of cloud also moved from in front and stood behind them, coming between the armies of Egypt and Israel. Throughout the night the cloud brought darkness to the one side and light to the other side; so neither went near the other all night long.

"Then Moses stretched out his hand over the sea, and all that night the Lord drove the sea back with a strong east wind and turned it into dry land. The waters were divided, and the Israelites went through the sea on dry ground, with a wall of water on their right and on their left.

"The Egyptians pursued them, and all Pharaoh's horses and chariots and horsemen followed them into the sea. In the morning watch the Lord looked down from the pillar of fire and cloud at the Egyptian army and threw it into confusion. He made the wheels of their chariots come off so that they had difficulty driving. And the Egyptians said, 'Let's get away from the Israelites! The Lord is fighting for them against Egypt.'

"Then the Lord said to Moses, "Stretch out your hand over the sea so that the waters may flow back over the Egyptians and their chariots and horsemen." Moses stretched out his hand over the sea, and at daybreak the sea went back to its place. The Egyptians were fleeing toward it, and the Lord swept them into the sea. The water flowed back and covered the chariots and horsemen - the entire army of Pharaoh that had followed the Israelites into the sea. Not one of them survived.

"But the Israelites went through the sea on dry ground, with a wall of water on their right and on their left" (Book of Exodus, Chapter 14).

***

Today, people are still talking about the parting of the Red Sea. Many scholars are continuing their research on the actual route that the Israelites might have taken when they left Egypt. Today, archaeologists are still looking for hard and solid evidence that the Red Sea really turned into dry land. Today, computer nerds are using all kinds of sophisticated computer calculations to find out if the amazing biblical account of the parting of the Red Sea really happened as described in the Bible. To Bible-believing Christians, the parting of the Red Sea happened precisely as narrated in the Holy Bible. Just one ordinary deed by Omnipotent God.

***

Let me share some interesting information about the parting of the Red Sea and the 40-year journey of the Israelites in the desert before they reached the Promised Land:

l In 1978, a certain Ron Wyatt and his two sons dived down the sea bed of the Gulf of Aquaba and found many chariot parts already encrusted with coral. One was an eight-spoke chariot wheel. Ron Wyatt reportedly consulted the director of Egyptian Antiquities who opined that the chariot wheel found was used during the 18th Egyptian dynasty and set the date of the exodus of the Israelites from Egypt to 1446 BC. The director of the Egyptian Antiquities also said that this was during the time of Pharaoh Ramases II and Tutmoses (Moses). …

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