Floods in Europe.(WORLD)(WORLD REVIEW)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 18, 2002 | Go to article overview

Floods in Europe.(WORLD)(WORLD REVIEW)


Byline: David Jones, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Floods in Europe

Like most other American news media, we devoted a great deal of space last week to the dramatic floods that swept across northern Europe and killed almost 100 people by week's end.

Yet none of us gave anything like the same amount of attention to massive floods in parts of South and Southeast Asia that killed 10 times as many people.

Does this mean we consider European lives more precious than Asian lives?

No, absolutely not. But there is a sort of macabre calculus whereby violent death seems more interesting to readers the closer it occurs to home - and the more closely the readers are able to identify with the victims.

By this measure, we pay far more attention to a shooting in a school in the United States than to a similar incident in Germany and would pay far more attention again if it happened in a local jurisdiction.

European crises in general get a lot of attention in American newspapers because so many of our readers are of European descent and still feel some connection to one European country or another. In cities with large Asian populations - Toronto and San Francisco come to mind - the Asian floods undoubtedly will have been covered more closely.

The European floods also seemed more gripping because so many of our readers have visited the cities where they were happening and toured the historic buildings that were at risk of being destroyed. People always seem more interested in reading about places and things when they have some first-hand knowledge of them.

Finally, there was an element of "newness" about the European floods that was missing from those in Asia, and newspapers are about nothing if not what is new.

The floods in Germany and the Czech Republic sent waters to levels not seen since the 19th century, if ever, and threatened to destroy historic landmarks in Prague that had survived wars dating back to medieval times.

The Asian floods, while tragic, were not that unusual for a region that is all too accustomed to suffering huge death tolls from typhoons, monsoon-related floods and other weather phenomena.

Getting on the story

The major wire agencies were slow to make a big deal about the European floods, leading to a mixed response from American papers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Floods in Europe.(WORLD)(WORLD REVIEW)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.