The Ten Million Dollar Agent; Robin Walker Meets the CIA's Latest All-American Hero, Ben Affleck Ben Affleck Plays a Younger Jack Ryan, a Part Previously Played by Harrison Ford and Alec Baldwin

The Birmingham Post (England), August 17, 2002 | Go to article overview

The Ten Million Dollar Agent; Robin Walker Meets the CIA's Latest All-American Hero, Ben Affleck Ben Affleck Plays a Younger Jack Ryan, a Part Previously Played by Harrison Ford and Alec Baldwin


Ben Affleck seems to have it all. By the age of 30, he's won an Oscar, made millions from his hit films and now he's half of the hottest Hollywood celebrity couple, and the envy of men worldwide, dating actress and singer Jennifer Lopez.

And the actor is set for even more success, after getting the part of CIA agent Jack Ryan in The Sum Of All Fears.

The film is the fourth screen adventure for the character, created by Tom Clancy, and brought to life by Alec Baldwin in The Hunt for Red October and Ford in Patriot Games and Clear and Present Danger.

This time the CIA analyst isn't a wily veteran as 60-year-old Ford depicted him, but an awkward new recruit who must face up to a nuclear threat by terrorists wanting to draw America and Russia into war.

'We've taken the character back where he has only been at the CIA for a short time. This makes him a very different character from what Alec or Harrison created,' says Affleck, who was given the chance to play Ryan after Ford dropped out.

Director Phil Alden Robinson had to have the script rewritten to fit with the younger actor, but he believes the more naive character will appeal to audiences.

'In a movie like this I think it's so much more refreshing to see a young guy who doesn't quite know his way around and isn't experienced with danger having to deal with this situation.'

And Affleck agrees that the new depiction should be a hit. 'Jack's not James Bond and I like that,' he says. 'I think this is a smart summer movie for adults.'

But he believes that the film does take several chances. 'It's a risk starting this character at the beginning and it's a risk to depict this kind of terrorist plot.'

Shot before the September 11 attacks, what was made as a political thriller gained a whole new resonance after the destruction of the World Trade towers.

'Ironically we thought the biggest hurdle in terms of promoting the movie would be trying to get people not to say, 'This is too far fetched',' he says. 'After what happened on 9/11 that's tragically not an issue at all. The movie changed without changing a frame.'

The film depicts a nuclear device going off at a packed Baltimore stadium, but Robinson didn't dwell on depicting the carnage, much of which is implied instead, something which Affleck believes was the right approach.

'Fortunately I think Phil shot it in a way that's not gratuitous,' he says. 'It's realistic but respectful. This is not like a big disaster for the sake of eye candy. It's done in a way that tries to imagine what it would really be like.

'Everyone should find this disturbing. Violence in movies should disturb you, it shouldn't be done just to make a big splash. That may be one of the transitions we've made, in that we no longer look at violence in such a flip way. This movie asks you to look at it in a real way.'

If the film is a success, Affleck could be back playing Ryan again - and a series of sequels could be a goldmine for him. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Ten Million Dollar Agent; Robin Walker Meets the CIA's Latest All-American Hero, Ben Affleck Ben Affleck Plays a Younger Jack Ryan, a Part Previously Played by Harrison Ford and Alec Baldwin
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.