Crack through the Crisp Crust for a Breakfast Treat

Sunset, November 1990 | Go to article overview

Crack through the Crisp Crust for a Breakfast Treat


Expecting company for breakfast? Dress up the occasion with a casserole based on cereal grains. In the first dish, steel-cut oats (found with fancy foods at the supermarket) bake tender and sweet in a soft custard; a separately broiled sugar topping mimics creme brulee. In the second casserole, an apple streusel mixture bakes on bulgur (cracked wheat).

Oats and Crime Brulee

4 cups water

1 cup steel-cut oats

2 cups half-and-half (light cream)

1/2 to 1/2 cup sugar

4 large egg yolks

1 teaspoon vanilla

Brown-sugar brulee crust (recipe follows)

In a 1 1/2- to 2-quart pan, combine water and oats. Bring to a boil over high heat. Simmer, uncovered, until oats are tender to bite and liquid is absorbed, about 30 minutes; stir occasionally. Pour oats into an 8- by 12-inch oval casserole at least 2 1/2 inches deep; set in a larger baking pan.

In the pan used to cook oats, combine cream and sugar to taste. Stir frequently over medium-high beat until scalding.

Beat yolks and vanilla in a bowl with a little of the hot cream. Stir mixture into pan, then pour over oats. Set pans on center rack in a 325[deg] oven. Pour boiling water into outer pan to level of custard. Bake until custard jiggles only slightly in center when gently shaken, about 45 minutes. At once, lift from water.

With 2 wide spatulas or your fingers, gently transfer brown-sugar crust onto custard; if crust breaks, fit together on top. Makes 6 servings.

Per serving: 325 cal; 6.4 g protein; 15 g fat; 42 g carbo.; 63 mg sodium; 176 mg chol.

Brown-sugar brulee crust. On a sheet of foil, set dish that will hold baked oats. Gently trace around the base with a pencil, taking care not to tear foil.

Coat area within outline with about 2 tablespoons soft butter or margarine. …

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