Woodrow Wilson Had Two Wives, but Not at the Same Time

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 21, 2002 | Go to article overview

Woodrow Wilson Had Two Wives, but Not at the Same Time


Byline: J. Hope Babowice

You wanted to know

Melissa Laneman, 8, of Vernon Hills wanted to know:

Did Woodrow Wilson have two wives?

If you have a question you'd like Kids Ink to answer, write Kids Ink, care of the Daily Herald, 50 Lakeview Parkway, Suite 104, Vernon Hills, IL 60061 or send an e-mail to lake@@dailyherald.com. Along with the question, include your name, age, phone number, hometown, grade and school.

For more information

To learn more about President Woodrow Wilson, the Fremont Area Public Library in Mundelein suggests:

- "America in World War I" by Edward F. Donal.

- "The World War I Tommy" by Martin Windrow.

- "So You Want To Be President?" by Judith St. George.

- "The Complete History of Our Presidents, Volume 8" by Michael Weber.

- "Woodrow Wilson" by David R. Collins.

Melissa Laneman, 8, a soon-to-be third-grader at Hawthorn Options School in Vernon Hills, asked, "Did Woodrow Wilson have two wives?"

Thomas Woodrow Wilson, our nation's 28th president, is remembered for his unwavering leadership during World War I. His steadfast determination to make politics fair won the hearts of the people, and his staunch interest in uniting the world through the League of Nations, now known as the United Nations, won him a Nobel Peace Prize. Some significant accomplishments during his presidency included the founding of the Federal Reserve banking system, the institution of federal income tax and women's suffrage.

Born in 1856, Wilson was brought up in a religious family from Virginia. His father was a Presbyterian minister, well-known for his inspiring sermons. Tommy, as Woodrow Wilson was called, was a late reader-he was 9 before he learned the alphabet and 11 before he really read well. …

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